LI President Defines Criterion For Being A Conservative
Lauren Hart
December 14, 2010
LI President Defines Criterion For Being A Conservative
December 14, 2010, Arlington, VA—With the recent elections behind us, how should conservatives move forward? Who should lead this movement? LI President Morton Blackwell answers these questions in his recent blog post. Mr. Blackwell's RedState blog post entitled, A Better Definition of Who is a Conservative, begins, “The most important political development of the just-concluded election cycle is the enormously effective, new, political involvement of grassroots conservatives through the Tea Party groups and other, major, analogous organizations.” “My Leadership Institute has trained newly active conservatives in partnership with every one of these major groups. My staff and I therefore probably understand all these groups as well or better than anyone else.” “If these groups continue active and growing, the 2012 elections will go much as the 2010 elections did.” Mr. Blackwell's ponders what makes a person a conservative. “In this era when claiming to be a conservative can be a pathway to power for opportunists, we must better define who is truly a conservative.” “I suggest this criterion: Conservatives are people who do more for conservative principles than they think they absolutely have to do. Only meeting such a standard will sustain the enthusiasm of the millions of grassroots conservatives who emerged politically in 2010.” To read the full blog post, please click here. The Leadership Institute is an educational foundation whose mission is to increase the number and effectiveness of conservative activists and leaders in the public policy process. To accomplish this, LI identifies, recruits, trains, and places conservatives in government, politics, and the media. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, more than 90,000 people have been trained (with half of those being in the last six years) in one or more of the 40 current programs offered in all 50 states and across the globe. For more information, please visit: http://www.leadershipinstitute.org -30-
PAC Study Shows Likely Business Interests for 2010 Elections
March 2, 2010
PAC Study Shows Likely Business Interests for 2010 Elections
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Morton Blackwell DATE: Tuesday, March 2, 2010 (703) 247 2000 * * * MEDIA RELEASE * * * * * * PAC Study Shows Likely Business Interests for 2010 Elections *** The Leadership Institute has released its study of the publicly disclosed political contributions of corporate and business association political action committees in the most recent (2007-2008) election cycle. The study reports fully on the giving of all 1,036 business-related PACs which gave $25,000 or more to federal election candidates in the 2007-2008 election cycle. The study reveals the major business PACs' giving patterns to several types of political candidates including Republicans, Democrats, conservatives, liberals, incumbents, and challenger candidates. These giving trends enable legislators, candidates, business leaders and journalists to discover the political giving of corporate America. The report tracks and ranks the giving patterns of business PACs by the recipients' political affiliation and category “Candidates and campaigns for the upcoming 2010 elections could target those major business PACs most likely to contribute to them,” said Morton C. Blackwell, president of The Leadership Institute. “They could focus on ‘hunting where the ducks are.'” The report includes the addresses of all 1,036 PACs studied. The study also allows employees, corporate stockholders, and business association members to compare their association PACs with other PACs. Investors at all levels can learn about and influence their business PAC's giving to U.S. House and Senate candidates. “Customers can see the political giving of corporations with which they have done business,” said Blackwell. “They could change vendors if they didn't agree with their political giving pattern.” This is the latest of the biennial PAC reports released by The Leadership Institute. ###
The Laws of Public Policy
LI
March 24, 2000
The Laws of Public Policy
1. Never give a bureaucrat a chance to say no. 2. Don't fire all your ammunition at once. 3. Don't get mad except on purpose. 4. Effort is admirable. Achievement is valuable. 5. Make the seal more expensive than it's worth. 6. Give ‘em a title and get ‘em involved. 7. Expand the leadership. 8. You can't beat a plan with no plan. 9. Political technology determines political success. 10. Sound doctrine is sound politics. 11. In politics, you have your word and your friends; go back on either and you're dead. 12. Keep your eyes on the main chance and don't stop to kick every barking dog. 13. Don't make the perfect the enemy of the good. 14. Remember the other side has troubles too. 15. Don't treat good guys like you treat bad guys. 16. A well-run movement takes care of its own. 17. Hire at least as many to the right of you as to the left of you. 18. You can't save the world if you can't pay the rent. 19. All gains are incremental; some increments aren't gains. 20. A stable movement requires a healthy, reciprocal I.O.U. flow among its participants. Don't keep a careful tally. 21. An ounce of loyalty is worth a pound of cleverness. 22. Never miss a political meeting if you think there's the slightest chance you'll wish you'd been there. 23. In volunteer politics, a builder can build faster than a destroyer can destroy. 24. Actions have consequences. 25. The mind can absorb no more than the seat can endure. 26. Personnel is policy. 27. Remember it's a long ball game. 28. The test of moral ideas is moral results. 29. You can't beat somebody with nobody. 30. Better a snake in the grass than a viper in your bosom. 31. Don't fully trust anyone until he has stuck with a good cause which he saw was losing. 32. A prompt, generous letter of thanks can seal a commitment which otherwise might disappear when the going gets rough. 33. Governing is campaigning by different means. 34. You cannot make friends of your enemies by making enemies of your friends. 35. Choose your enemies as carefully as you choose your friends. 36. Keep a secure home base. 37. Don't rely on being given anything you don't ask for. 38. In politics, nothing moves unless it's pushed. 39. Winners aren't perfect. They made fewer mistakes than their rivals. 40. One big reason is better than many little reasons. 41. In moments of crisis, the initiative passes to those who are best prepared. 42. Politics is of the heart as well as of the mind. Many people don't care how much you now until they know how much you care. 43. Promptly report your action to the one who requested it. 44. Moral outrage is the most powerful motivating force in politics. 45. Pray as if it all depended on God; work as if it all depended on you. Morton Blackwell President, The Leadership Institute
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