Mother of 7 Changes Homeschooling Families' Lives
Erin Morrissey
July 13, 2017
Mother of 7 Changes Homeschooling Families' Lives
Deep commitment to family and community drives many conservatives into action.For Tracy Klicka, her deep commitment to motherhood and the homeschool movement drives her to help homeschooling families across the nation. She walks beside them to ensure their success in their children's lives.“I think most homeschooling parents need a lot of encouragement,” Tracy said. “You know your kids more than anyone…you are their best advocate, you're their biggest cheerleader, you're the best counselor, you're the best person to watch what walking through life, through challenges and difficulties is.”Today, Tracy is the Director of Development for the Home School Foundation (HSF), a part of the Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA), which offers support for homeschool families.“HSF is the heart of HSLDA,” Tracy said. “The heart is to help families who so want to homeschool their children, but they can't afford the cost of curriculum.”Tracy had not always planned to be in such a position. But the challenges and victories she experienced in her life created in her a desire that rings true with the heart of HSF.Tracy attended Grove City College where met her late husband Chris. She continued her studies at Oral Roberts University, where she earned her degree in music education. After Tracy and her husband were married, they moved to DC, where Chris quickly became a leading expert on home education and was the first full-time lawyer for Concerned Women for America (CWA).During this time, Tracy began searching for a job in the area. “I didn't even know where to start looking,” she said. At that time, the Free Congress Foundation needed to fill an executive assistant position for the political action committee. Tracy applied and got the job.While at Free Congress Foundation, Tracy worked with Paul Weyrich, whom she credits with pushing her to develop skills that would later enable her to successfully fulfill her position at HSF.“Paul Weyrich was such an amazing man,” Tracy said. “I put Morton Blackwell up in the very same category as I put Paul -- they are both incredible mentors to young people.”Paul Weyrich sent Tracy to a 3-day women's spokesperson conference at the Leadership Institute (LI). Tracy credits that training with helping her over her fear of public speaking.“Even though it would be almost ten years later before I would give my first talk,” Tracy said, “I really look back at his training and his personal mentorship as what really propelled me in the right direction and really helped me get over [the idea that] I will never speak in public.”Tracy and her husband had 7 children and homeschooled them all. “We knew before we started having kids that we wanted to homeschool, so I was a stay at home Mom homeschooling for about 24 years,” she said.Tragically, after 25 years of marriage, Tracy's husband passed away and Tracy became a single homeschool mother. She needed a part-time job to support herself and her children. Because of her late husband's connections at HSLDA, she began her search there.In 2011, she took her current position as the Director of Development at the Home School Foundation with little knowledge or experience in development. But, this position fulfills her drive to offer support to homeschool families who had been through difficulties like her own.Despite her initial lack of experience, Tracy grew the department and plans further expansion this coming year all while serving as the only person in her department. She single-handedly manages donor relations, writing, planning, data entry, and research.The Leadership Institute, Tracy says, gave “me the best practices and information I need for the different segments of my work responsibility in Development.”LI's development and fundraising trainings have been a great encouragement and resource for Tracy. Through LI's lectures, she has learned the importance of partnerships. “It's really all about relationships. It's really enabling those who want to partner with you because they have a passion for your mission and how you can help them make that happen.”Looking back at her growth in the area of development and fundraising, Tracy remarks about LI, “I can't think of where else I would go [for training]… or who else would I talk to… because you have been doing it for so long… you know so many people in many conservative organizations… you've had a relationship with them for so many years… your longevity gives what you do so much weight and validity.” For years, Tracy had a crippling fear of public speaking; but now she regularly speaks at homeschool conventions where she offers encouragement to parents. She traces her ease and confidence in public speaking back to the training she received at LI.“I really look back at that training as a part of what really helped me get over [the idea] that, I will never speak in public,” Tracy said.Today, Tracy's passion radiates through her voice as she speaks.“We can really come along side our kids,” Tracy tells parents. “Homeschooling is the perfect way to do that.”Although Tracy sees many benefits in homeschooling she states, “Homeschooling didn't prevent my kids from struggling. It's not a formula; but it's an opportunity to walk alongside children and to best prepare them for life and so when they go through those hard times you're right there with them and just by God's grace you try to help them work through some of those things.”She says homeschooling is “walking through life together 24/7.”After her 24 years of homeschooling her children, Tracy confidently says, “My kids are my magnum opus… I don't think I could put anything above the value of motherhood.” She says her life's biggest accomplishment is, “raising seven children who are really incredible adults, who all love life, love learning, and want to engage their culture.”This is what she hopes to help other parents achieve through their homeschooling experience. Her deep commitment and vision are making that happen.As Director of Development for HSF, Tracy is expanding her vision for supporting homeschooling families and fulfilling her biggest motivation. She touches families across America with her love of home education by reaching out to homeschooling families in need, providing wisdom and encouragement as she speaks to them about the homeschooling experience.“I love what I do because it fits with my passion for motherhood and how important a role we have in our children's lives,” she says.Tracy has truly turned her deep commitment into fulfillment. Join me in congratulating Tracy Klicka on her success helping homeschooling families.If you're interested in fundraising or public speaking trainings like the ones Tracy mentioned, you can learn more here. Leadership Institute offers more than 47 types of training programs, works with more than 1,868 conservative student groups, and helps employers connect with conservative job seekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 186,207 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders.>
At 22, Amir Farahi Takes Action to Help His Community in Canada
Gordon Arnold
July 7, 2017
At 22, Amir Farahi Takes Action to Help His Community in Canada
At the age of 22, Amir Farahi has run for local office and has established a think-tank in his hometown of London, Canada. His family fled Iran's totalitarian government in the 1970's, which would later inspire him to run for City Council. Amir became the youngest person to run for office in his hometown. His campaign was a pivotal force in spurring millennials to make an impact on the political process. “I would have never guessed ten years ago that I would run for the City Council,” Amir said. Although he lost his first attempt at public office, Amir wanted more in-depth political training. After receiving positive recommendations from his friends, Amir decided to attend Leadership Institute's Campaign Management School. The four-day training provided him with the tools and knowledge to put together a successful campaign plan. “The Campaign Management School's hands-on exercises were useful and resourceful, as they accurately demonstrated the process of putting together a campaign and doing research,” Amir said. “I have taken forty pages of notes and I still have a whole day left of the training!”Amir aspires to be a civic leader who “provides plans and solutions to enhance the standard of living and improve people's lives.” To fulfill this ambitious task, he organized Canadian think-and-do tank, The London Institute. This organization works to bring people together to solve problems and spur economic development. Amir doesn't know what his future holds, but he has no doubt the Leadership Institute equipped him to succeed in politics. “The Leadership Institute has taught me the best process to pursue in order to put together a campaign plan and do the necessary research in the most thorough way possible. Additionally, I learned this week about the hands-on skills that I need in order to put on fundraising events, campaign events, and similar staples of a political campaign. The Leadership Institute even spent time detailing social media skills in a thorough way.” The Campaign Management School, in Amir's words, took “what could have been a complicated campaign machine and broke it into smaller pieces to help us understand how it operates.” As a recent graduate from Western University with a Bachelor's degree in Political Science and Economics, Amir nonetheless proclaimed, “The past four days were a better and more useful educational experience than the entire four years of my degree program in Political Science.” Whether Amir ultimately holds elected office, manages a campaign, or expands his think-tank, he says his experience at the Campaign Management School gave him the skills to be a “leader of his community.” When asked for his advice for newcomers to the political arena, Amir said: “If you are looking to get involved in politics, then the Leadership Institute should be your first stop. It is the one place where you can gain the practical skills to know how to effectively campaign.” Join me and congratulate Amir on his innovation and persistence to make a difference in his community.If you're interested in the Campaign Management School Amir took, you can learn more here. Leadership Institute offers more than 47 types of training programs, working with more than 1,868 conservative student groups, and helping employers connect with conservative job seekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 186,207 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders.>
Interns Learn from Successful Conservative Leaders at Conservative Intern Workshop
Annamarie Rienzi
June 26, 2017
Interns Learn from Successful Conservative Leaders at Conservative Intern Workshop
Interns from across the conservative movement came to the Leadership Institute on June 21 for the Conservative Intern Workshop. The 94 interns who attended, representing the White House, Congress, FreedomWorks, Young American's for Liberty, and more than 32 other organizations. They learned how to make the most of their internships in DC beyond simply showing up to work every day.These interns learned from Steve Sutton, the Leadership Institute's Vice President of Development, about his method of impressing supervisors by understanding the philosophy and politics surrounding their roles. Next, the Young Americans for Liberty Director of Mobilization Justin Greiss spoke about how to best highlight their experiences by writing clean and consistent resumes. Justin also talked about the best way to communicate enthusiasm to potential employers by writing outstanding cover letters.During lunch, participants networked with each other and learned about new organizations. Dante Kari, an intern in the Leadership Institute's Youth Leadership School was especially excited to meet with other interns. “I met folks interning for conservative organizations I didn't even know existed,” he said.Next, the Leadership Institute's Director of Digital Training, Abigail Alger, spoke about how to reach savings goals while living in as expensive a city as D.C.Andrew Magloughlin, the Economic Research Intern at FreedomWorks, said, “I learned how to apply my philosophy of fiscal conservatism to my own expenses and goals while flourishing.”Following Abby's presentation, the Leadership Institute's Stephen Rowe spoke about Social Media Branding. He taught attendees how to draw attention to their digital profiles in pursuit of full-time employment.The training continued with Networking to Find Jobs, a lecture from Lauren Bouton, a Public Policy Associate at Facebook. The interns found this information particularly useful because it emphasized that the point of networking is to meet and make meaningful connections with other interns.Katie Wilson the Leadership Institute's Technology Intern said, “I had no idea that it was acceptable to end a conversation with someone if it's gone on a bit too long! I really needed clarification on that point. Now I know that the point of networking is to meet many people!”The last session of the day was a panel with Leadership Institute's Director of Career Services Patricia Simpson, Americans for Prosperity's National Recruiting Manager Haley Pike, The Heritage Foundation's Recruiting Associate Kyle Bonnell, and Charles Koch Institute's Alumni Relations Coordinator Kasey Darling. Attendees were thrilled to hear from recruiters from such high profile organizations.Giovanni Triana, an intern for the American Legislative Exchange Council said, “The Job Seeking and Networking Panel at the Leadership Institute's Conservative Intern Workshop played a significant role in preparing me to be bold and effective in my outreach efforts. I learned tips and techniques from the experts themselves and I can honestly say that I am more confident in the way I approach networking after hearing from the seasoned panelists.”The day ended with a complimentary headshot photo shoot at Leadership Institute in the Steven P. J. Wood Building lobby.Attendees said the Conservative Intern Workshop was an extremely valuable training. Sarah Persichetti, an intern for In Defense of Christians, said, “Everyone that LI brought in to speak to us was so knowledgeable and passionate! I could really tell they were dedicated to helping conservative interns navigate the intimidating world of networking and professionalism.”The Leadership Institute's Career Service Department will hold its next event on July 11. To register for the Professional Development Workshop please follow the link here.>
The Leadership Institute’s Think Tank Opportunity Workshop
Ben Woodward
June 20, 2017
The Leadership Institute’s Think Tank Opportunity Workshop
On July 13 and 14, the Leadership Institute held the very first Think Tank Opportunity Workshop. Eighty-six conservatives attended to learn how they can successfully build a career in this field. The workshop contributes to the Leadership Institute's mission to increase the size and effectiveness of conservative activists because conservative think tanks are only effective in influencing public policy if they have principled conservatives, passionate about quality research, working for them. The first day covered the career opportunities within think tanks. Our first speaker, Lori Sanders who is the Associate Vice President of Federal Affairs at the R Street Institute discussed the types of think tanks currently operating in the movement and the routes in which people take to secure a career. The second speaker, Helena Richardson, Director of the Young Leaders Program at The Heritage Foundation taught attendees about the different career paths within think tanks such as events, marketing, development, and more. Helena also discussed how to go about finding the first job and internship in a think tank. Finally, Michael Bowman, Vice President of Policy at the American Legislative Exchange Council taught attendees how to be a leader in their field and establish themselves as an expert. He also taught attendees what senior recruiters are looking for when hiring and the importance of being passionate about their chosen field.The second day placed a focus on research and influencing public policy. The first speaker, Trevor Burrus, who is a Research Fellow at the CATO Institute's Center for Constitutional Studies, taught attendees how to research and compose policy proposals that make an impact and are easily readable. The Hon. Becky Norton Dunlop followed Trevor; she is the Ronald Reagan Distinguished Fellow at The Heritage Foundation. She covered how a think tank uses its research to influence decision makers and public opinion as a whole.Finally, Karen Czarnecki, Vice President for Outreach at the Mercatus Center, concluded the workshop by teaching attendees how think tanks build coalitions and how they can collaborate with organizations to maximize the effectiveness of their research.Following the workshop, feedback was overwhelmingly positive with one attendee remarking; “An excellent program with generous speakers and staff. All speakers were willing to network with students involved and were very willing to invest in our futures!”Due to the success of the Think Tank Opportunity Workshop, the Leadership Institute will be holding another on November 6 and 7, 2017.>
5 Reasons You Should Consider Working for a Conservative Movement Abroad
Ben Woodward
June 15, 2017
5 Reasons You Should Consider Working for a Conservative Movement Abroad
You can probably recall a number of sobering moments in your life where you had the opportunity to either step up or retreat from a challenge. When I was 23, I moved to the United States from the UK to work for the Leadership Institute. The prospect to work in the American conservative movement for an organization like LI, which is so pivotal, was an exciting one.However exciting the opportunity, I remember the moment I arrived at my accommodation. I put my cases down and froze. It dawned on me that I had just quit my job, and left the security of my friends and family. It was a scary prospect; but nine months later, I would recommend the experience to anybody.Here are five reasons you should consider working for a conservative movement abroad.You learn a lot from another country's practicesConservative movements, or indeed any kind of industry, do things differently in different countries. This makes you both an asset and a liability. An asset, because you bring new ideas and experiences to the table. A liability, because your knowledge of basic work practices in your new country may be lacking.Nevertheless, you can be confident that having worked for a conservative movement abroad will make you an asset in your home country. If conservative movements are to be successful, they should be open to new ideas and employ talent globally, just as the private sector does.It's a test of characterThrowing yourself into unfamiliar territory is an opportunity to prove yourself. A good employee should be able to adapt to new challenges and face them head on. If you are able to build a network of friends, establish yourself in a new environment, and succeed in a different working environment, then you signal to employers that you can adapt to new challenges.In addition, it forces you to mature. When you move to a new country, you cannot depend upon the safety of your traditional support network. You are on your own, and rising to that challenge means you can be depended upon to support others.It will broaden your mindConservatives in different countries have different ideas and policy priorities. The UK and US conservative movements are very different. The experience will challenge your views, and you will learn a great deal about areas of policy you know nothing about.Being an effective conservative requires you to have a broad understanding of policy, and the arguments for our movement. Working for a movement abroad, you will learn new examples of conservatism in action and be exposed to new organizations from which you can learn.You will work with inspiring new peopleConservatives are dedicated to our cause; it's why we're winning. Working for a conservative organization abroad is an opportunity to network with a whole new pool of conservative talent. These people are future leaders and elected officials you can learn from. It is also a great chance to make new friends who share your values. You will have the chance to attend events like conferences, campaign launches, and more that you would otherwise be unable to attend.It's fun!Who doesn't love traveling? The opportunity to see new places, eat new food, and make everybody jealous on social media are some benefits of working abroad. It's an experience you'll remember forever. You only live once!If you're thinking about working for a conservative organization outside the U.S. consider the following:Hans Seidel FoundationInternational Democrat UnionWilfried Martens Centre for European Studies (Think tank for European People's Party)Unión de Partidos Latinoamericanos (UPLA)Canadian Taxpayers' Association >
Five things you should do in your first week at a new job
Ben Woodward
May 22, 2017
Five things you should do in your first week at a new job
Starting a new job is among the most daunting experiences in our professional lives. After all, you only get one chance at a first impression.As well as trying to wrap your head around your new responsibilities, learn the office culture, make friends, and demonstrate your ability, you're also trying to keep your feet on the ground and build a successful future for yourself.It is natural to want to keep your head down and not draw attention to yourself, like a mouse among sleeping cats. This is a mistake! Here are five things you should do in your first week:Ask your supervisor (and employees) to lunchBy asking your supervisor to lunch, you are showing your new boss that you are confident in your new role and you are serious about learning the ropes. I would advise you to keep this lunch just the two of you if possible, as other employees may dominate the conversation.It is also an effective way to get to know your supervisor on a one-to-one basis, outside of the formal office environment. It is important for them to get to know you. This is your chance to tell them what you want out of this job and where you would like to go in your career.If you're a manager, take your staff out to lunch, either in small groups, or one-to-one if possible. This is your chance to understand what makes these individuals tick, and establish what you expect from them.Introduce yourself to everybody in the officeYou will be spending lots of time with the people in your department and organization over the next few months and years. So be sure to take some time to introduce yourself to everybody in the kitchens, boardrooms, or even by visiting their workspace.Understanding the office culture is critical to success. You will likely need to collaborate with other departments on a multitude of projects, so make friends with them quickly to establish your relationship. Too many new employees fail to integrate themselves into the social side of a new office and get left out in the cold.Learn about all of the current and upcoming projectsFully brief yourself on all of the current projects in your department. Wherever possible, you should do your research, but do not be afraid to ask smart questions. It is in your colleagues' interests to help you succeed, as your work will affect theirs.Try to establish what other people are working on and where you can be of assistance, but also what scope you have for innovation. Every employer is different; some will let you pursue your projects, whereas others prefer a top-down approach. Learn about the location of your officeBeing successful at work requires you to be happy in your job, and comfortable in your environment. However moving to a new place, especially if you have moved away from home or college for the first time can make you feel isolated and unsettled. This is not conducive to success in your new job.Ensure that you learn the area quickly. Where are the best restaurants, bars, and coffee shops? What activities are happening locally? With whom in your office do you share hobbies?This will help you to settle quickly into your new environment, and even take the lead in your office's social life.Reconnect with former colleaguesIt is easy when you start a new job to be swept up in your new professional life. As a keen networker, try to get into the habit of keeping in touch with your old colleagues quickly.You never know when you will need a referral, or when your new job requires a connection from your past. Remember to keep those professional relationships alive. >
Recruiters hire through social media
Ben Woodward
May 8, 2017
Recruiters hire through social media
What if I told you that Facebook has been around since 2004? That's 13 years! Twitter has existed since 2006. Even seemingly newer forms of social media like Snapchat (2011) and Instagram (2010) are not new.Most jobseekers are only just waking up to the potential of social media for their careers. More and more, recruiters hire through social media. Even if they rely primarily on job boards, you can be confident they will investigate your social media for background checks.By failing to demonstrate your employability on social media, you are doing yourself a disservice. In this blog, I want to focus on how you can convey your skills and expertise on social media.During your day-to-day work life, you demonstrate your professional abilities. You may write articles, speeches, or research briefings. Perhaps you show your organizational skills by managing an event, or you demonstrate your communication skills by speaking at a conference.You should post these activities on your social media, partnered with a photograph, video, or site link. By failing to share them, you fail to give recruiters the opportunity to see you at your best. Worst of all, you have done the work, and recruiters may never know.Even simple gestures make a huge difference. If you have great coworkers or employees, for example, consider praising their work through social media. You will demonstrate your teamwork and leadership abilities, and they can share the comment on their pages.It is also better to share posts from your organization's page about your skills, or praise from a respected individual. This increases the validity of the post or tweet, rather than posting it yourself.Opportunities to demonstrate your expertise are not limited to your day-to-day work life. Here are some other ways you can get this across on social media:Write blogs, opeds, and articles in your spare time. Smaller journalistic organizations are always looking for stories to publish. If you want to show expertise in a particular area, consider writing about it.Retweet, comment on, and repost other people's social media. This is also an excellent way to engage people who can help your career.Make sure you like and follow relevant organizations and people who are successful in your chosen career path.Have a strong LinkedIn profile with a summary which outlines your experience and expertise. In addition, your LinkedIn should contain a full account of your professional experiences and achievements.Remember recruiters search your social media every time you apply for a job. This is your opportunity to not only tell them, but show them your skills and expertise.For more career tips, visit ConservativeJobs.com.>
The Hiring Freeze Has Been Lifted, What’s Your Plan?
Ben Woodward
April 24, 2017
The Hiring Freeze Has Been Lifted, What’s Your Plan?
On Tuesday, April 11, the Trump Administration made a surprise announcement that could be good news for job seekers across DC. The federal hiring freeze will be lifted.Instead, the administration is calling for a reform of the federal government, and a plan to reduce the overall size of the Federal Civilian Workforce.But what does this mean for job seekers in Washington D.C.?Cautious optimism. First, the administration has been clear this does not give Departments the freedom to go on a recruitment spending spree. The intention is to reshape the federal workforce, with some agencies having the flexibility to hire more people, and others paring their staff, while others will make lay-offs.This means if you are hoping to take advantage of the opportunities, you may be competing with experienced and well-connected former Federal employees hoping to be hired elsewhere.Secondly, budgetary proposals must go through the appropriations process. This is no easy task. Congress has already expressed its opposition to cuts on agencies such as the EPA, State, Health and Human Services, and others.Therefore, there is still uncertainty about the opportunities that will arise from this decision.One thing is for sure, if you are a job seeker in DC, or if you are looking for a career move, you should be ready for anything!The administration has been clear it intends to fund spending increases for Defense, Homeland Security, and Veterans Affairs. These departments were always exempt from the hiring freeze and now it looks as though the administration is freeing up budgetary space to prioritize these departments.If you are looking for a job in the Federal Government, and you want to make the most of the potential opportunities coming up, the strategic jobseekers will have a plan.If you're a new jobseeker, consider applying for internships that will get help you to establish yourself in the Federal Government. Opportunities such as the Presidential Management Fellowship Program for example are tough to get in, but provide great opportunities if you are successful.Start now by networking. Look for events across DC where you will have the opportunity to meet political appointees currently working in the administration. This is your opportunity to get to know people who can help you to find a place in the departments hiring. The Leadership Institute provides a number of resources to help you network, including workshops and our Job Seeker Guide.Your resume should be as strong as possible as you prepare to send it to potential recruiters. Have it ready to go now, and remember the Leadership Institute is available as a resource to you if you want to have your resume reviewed. You can arrange to meet with one of LI's careers staff to discuss ways to improve your resume through ConservativeJobs.com. >
Your 5-point guide to writing an op-ed
Autumn Campbell
April 20, 2017
Your 5-point guide to writing an op-ed
With the Leadership Institute's Building Your Brand Workshop around the corner, here are some pointers to give you a head start on building your brand through op-eds.You have something to say. But sometimes it can be difficult to know where to start. How do you get your voice out there?A good place to start is blogging. I know, I know, everyone has a blog. But there's a reason for that. You can practice putting your thoughts and arguments down while getting feedback from friends and peers.Through practice on your blog, you can begin to harness your thoughts and build a framework for your field of expertise.So you've been blogging – but you're ready for more. It's time to write an op-ed.An op-ed is an article or piece with an opinion and written with a strong point of view. Here's why you'll shine in an op-ed:You'll show your expertiseDevelop your argumentLearn to use facts to back up your argumentAnd establish your credibilityFollow these general guidelines for your op-ed:Limit your word count to about 700 words or lessOpen with a strong leadMake your argument quickly and conciselyRemember, you cannot submit a piece that's already been publishedBe patient and don't give upYou'll find many informative websites on how to submit your op-ed. Here are a few links with guidelines for DC area news sources to get you started:Washington ExaminerWashington TimesWashington PostPolitico The Hill Now go write! (And remember me when you're a rich and famous expert.)Still want more insight? Take LI's Building Your Brand: From Op-ed to On-camera Wednesday and Thursday evenings, April 26-27. Register here!>
Don’t delay, intern today
Ben Woodward and Mauricio Bento
April 5, 2017
Don’t delay, intern today
You may be wondering: “Should I apply for an internship in Washington, DC?”I was in the same boat fresh out of college. The options were vast, graduate school, part-time work, traveling, and more. At college, I postponed applying as so many do. Given the opportunity again, I'd do it differently.Many students go to college far away from their families; summer break, therefore, is a chance to spend some time with loved ones. However, summer is also the perfect time to get professional experience in D.C. If you are in your senior year and really would like to get your foot in the door, you can also apply for internships during the spring or the fall. You'll find about the same number of roles available, but organizations recieve a significantly smaller number of applications, and therefore spring and fall internships are less competitive.And you should know. It's competitive!Organizations like CATO, The Heritage Foundation, Americans for Prosperity, and the Leadership Institute receive vastly more applications than we have positions available.But if you take the process seriously, and do your research, there's no reason why you should fail.Here are five benefits of interning while you are still in college:1. Personal Development: Internships are about more than performing the responsibilities assigned. The best internships invest in people, teaching you professional skills, challenging you, and providing experiences that inspire you to want to succeed in your career. Even by applying you'll learn how to build your resume and prepare for an interview. On the job you'll learn how to write professional emails and speak in public. Those skills are essential and will help you much more in the long term than just listing an organization on your resume.2. Networking: D.C. is a city fueled by connections. If you are out of sight, you are out of mind. That is why interning while you are at college builds those solid relationships which will be so important when you graduate or apply for your next internship. 3. Freedom of expression: Take a break from liberals. If you are in college, chances are you are in the minority as a conservative. Many colleges act to suffocate open political discourse, and as a conservative, you are likely on the receiving end of leftist abuse. Come to intern in the conservative movement where your principles are valued, and you can learn to tackle leftist abuses on your campus.4. Discover your talents: Interning in D.C. is about gaining practical experience. It helps you confirm what you want to do, and what you do not. Many interns come to DC, and their internship confirms that they do indeed want to work on the Hill, for a think tank, or a non-profit. Others learn that it's not for them. Both lessons are equally valuable.5. Head start: The difference between the graduates who get a well-paying job out of college and those do not is internships. If you are forward thinking and you get that experience early, you will hit the ground running after graduation. If you do not, you will find yourself left behind. So which will it be?>
There is no Free Lunch
Mauricio Bento
March 30, 2017
There is no Free Lunch
A few days ago, LI president Morton Blackwell told me that when he was a college student at LSU, he and his friends heard Milton Friedman was available to speak for free at Morton's campus group. They were eager to bring such a distinguished intellectual to their university! This “free,” of course, meant he wouldn't charge any amount for himself, but the hosts would have to pay the travel and accommodation costs. In the end, there was no free Friedman.One of the most famous Milton Friedman quotes states, “there is no such thing as a free lunch,” an ironic response to the tremendous demand for “free stuff” by the socialists he debated. The phrase meant that no government program is free. The taxpayer always pays (an expensive bill) in the end.The first time I heard this quote, I was an 18-year-old college freshman at the University of Brasilia back in Brazil, my home country. I was taking an Introduction to Economics class, and the professor repeated the quote while explaining the foundations of microeconomics. That stuck in my mind. I was not a socialist, but I believed that more government intervention – more of the right intervention – could work. I thought that because I always looked at the benefits of government programs while ignoring the costs. That quote changed everything. From that day on, I would always remember that there was no free lunch, and government programs cost too much and deliver too little.In the last two weeks, I have finished re-reading Milton Friedman's book Capitalism and Freedom, as part of my LI internship book discussion program. I felt the passion my friends and I expressed during the debate over the need for more school choice and less occupational licensing regulations in the US. Friedman was part of my freshman year in college and now is part of my freshman year as a young professional in DC. His ideas are as relevant today as they were when he wrote them.They are relevant not only in the US but also in Brazil. So relevant that Folha de Sao Paulo, the #1 national newspaper in Brazil – read by more than 20 million people every month – published an editorial within the last few weeks that has a title inspired by Friedman's quote. The article, a harsh critique on excessive regulations on airline companies, also mentions Friedman's quote in both the introduction and conclusion.Friedman won the Nobel Prize, advised President Regan, wrote best-sellers, made a TV series about economic freedom with Arnold Schwarzenegger, and now serves as inspiration for us at the Leadership Institute (LI) and even for big newspapers. Not bad at all, right?Morton always says: “In politics, nothing moves unless pushed.”Friedman pushed. Now LI keeps pushing.>
Making Your Down Time Count
Ben Woodward
March 20, 2017
Making Your Down Time Count
When you begin your professional career, you'll start to notice a pattern developing.Work will begin to encroach on every part of your life.However, if your job is your first, second, and third priority, there's good news, you can still enjoy your downtime and focus on your career by choosing hobbies which advance your skills.For example, nobody likes that one colleague who can only talk about politics. Something as simple as being able to talk about sports, traveling, or cooking during an interview can mean the difference between you getting the job or not. So here are four ways you can enjoy your downtime and advance your career.Physical fitness – Being physically healthy is not the easiest thing in D.C. Especially if you work at Leadership Institute (LI) with a Cheesecake Factory around the corner! But when you're sitting at a desk for 8-10 hours a day, you need to focus on your physical well-being.Exercise increases blood flow to the brain which makes you more mentally alert. You will also have more energy, allowing you to wake up earlier and work longer. Finally, it's a well-known fact that exercise reduces stress. Education – This can cover all manner of possibilities, from reading a book to visiting museums or studying a course. Something as simple as switching off Netflix and picking up a good book will improve your writing ability and your creative thinking. Also improving your education will make you better able to match your colleagues intellectually in conversation.Taking new courses in language, business, etc. may be tough, but having that diversity of skill will make you more promotable and allow you to explore new career opportunities.Creativity – Think about ways you can become more creative. Challenge yourself! Perhaps it could be through learning a musical instrument or learning to paint and to draw. This would dramatically improve your ability to be creative at work and expand your horizons.Joining an acting club would be a chance to make new friends and improve your confidence speaking in front of others.Volunteering – Be the person in the office who cares about his community, who holds fundraisers or requests sponsorships for the next half marathon (although not too often). People are far more inclined to help you if they know that you're the type of person who helps others. This hobby could also be a great way for you to organize office events, in which people come together outside of work, and you can get to know your colleagues better.There are plenty more examples of how you can use your spare time productively to enjoy yourself while contributing to your career. So if work is your highest priority, that doesn't have to prevent you from having hobbies and interests.Invest in yourself! The Leadership Institute offers more than 47 types of training programs, working with more than 1,873 conservative student groups, and helping employers connect with conservative job seekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 182,327 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders. >
Six Reasons You Should Work for a Non-Profit
Ben Woodward and Mauricio Bento
March 6, 2017
Six Reasons You Should Work for a Non-Profit
To conservatives, the non-profit sector is an increasingly attractive career path -- and it's not surprising!It is an exciting time to be involved, the job opportunities are vast, and conservatism is making an increasing impact in America.I offer you 6 reasons why you should work in the non-profit sector.1. Jobs which produce tangible results are the most satisfying.My co-workers and I see tangible results of our work every day. The individuals who come to the Leadership Institute for training in professional skills get jobs. People who come to LI for campaign training get elected. People who LI trained in television techniques represent our movement on national television. Working for a non-profit means you get to see the effects of your hard work.2. The conservative non-profit sector is a small community.For those who are ambitious and talented networkers it's easy to move around. Within the DC non-profit sector, those in the conservative movement speak at each other's events, co-sponsor projects and hire each other's staff. Most recently, the Leadership Institute, The Heritage Foundation, and others played a significant role in staffing the administration. The ripple effect means they are vacating jobs in the non-profit sector, for which you can apply.Also, small teams make the best of friends. D.C. can be a daunting place. Those who move here to pursue career ambitions often leave families and friends behind. In the non-profit sector, because there are often such close ties between staff inside and outside of your organization, it is easy to make friends and become part of a community. 3. Are you creative? The non-profit sector is the place to experiment with new ways of doing things. If you're a forward thinker, if you want to pitch a new idea or project, or perform more efficiently, the non-profit sector is the place to do it. Remember, non-profits are accountable to donors, so it's not just the private sector that innovates. Non-profits, like the Leadership Institute, are consistently innovating to ensure we are leading the movement forward.4. You're not just a small cog in a giant machine. To ensure value for every donor's money, new staff are hired to fill critical roles. As a result, you are an important and valuable member of the team from day one. If you're a person who enjoys responsibility, and you want to push yourself to achieve in your day-to-day work, then work at a non-profit and push yourself.5. There's diversity of opportunity. Non-profits like the Leadership Institute offer a multitude of possibilities. Staff are transferred between departments so their talents are utilized effectively. Therefore, whether your talents are in research, fundraising, events, or public speaking, you have the opportunity to involve yourself in many responsibilities.Also, the non-profit sector in the conservative movement is thriving right now. Just look on ConservativeJobs.com. You'll see the numerous positions available to you. Whether you're looking for an internship or an executive level position, there are hundreds of opportunities waiting for you in a multitude of departments.6. Last, but not least – you're fighting for a cause bigger than yourself. To those in the conservative movement, seeing the enactment of conservative principles into the public policy realm is not just a news story, it is something to which they have actively contributed. Those policies then go on to benefit Americans and the world over. It's a crucial mission, and it's a privilege to be able to play a role in it.So if you're about to graduate, want to challenge yourself, change careers, or whatever your situation, consider working for a non-profit. Are you up to the challenge? If yes, then get started with Leadership Institute training today.>
Delving into the Mind of the Interviewer: What Are They Asking You?
Ben Woodward
January 30, 2017
Delving into the Mind of the Interviewer: What Are They Asking You?
Has an interviewer ever asked you a question that completely threw you off your game? Don't worry; it happens to the best of us. No matter how well we prepare -- we cannot anticipate every question. And to make it harder… weird interview questions are becoming fashionable! I've heard that Google and Facebook like to ask what kind of superpowers you'd like, others may ask your favorite color, or what kind of tree would you be?As if interviews weren't hard enough!As part of my role at the Leadership Institute, I help conservatives prepare for interviews. In the context of this, I ask standard competency and some strange interview questions with two goals: determining how they answer and whether they can decipher why I have asked the question.One of my favorites is: “If I gave you a million dollars, how would you spend it?” If I had a million dollars, between you and me, I'd hire Gordon Ramsay to come to my house and give me private cooking lessons! Joking aside, I want to use this blog to help you read the interviewer's mind. By this I don't mean telepathy -- I mean delving into the motive behind the questions to understand what the interviewer is truly asking you. Introductory Questions:These are questions you should have rehearsed answers to. The key is to know what quality the interviewer is asking you to show them.For example: What is your greatest weakness? Nobody is perfect, so clearly you have a weakness, mine is written communication and an excessive coffee addiction! What the employer is looking for is recognition of where you have to improve and also what action you are taking. Admitting a weakness isn't a bad thing. Just remember what the employer is looking for. On this occasion, they're interested to see whether you practice self-improvement.Other introductory questions may include: describe your work style, or your motivations. How do you measure success? Etc.Questions About the Organization:This is where your prior research is essential. It is unlikely that the interviewer will try to trip you up here. You're not expected to know how many members they had in 1982; it's not trivia! But there is no excuse for failing to do basic preparation. You should be aware of the mission, the core breakdown of the organization, recent news stories, and the management. What does the interviewer want from you? Evidence that you care about the organization, that you applied to them for a reason, and that you are committed to their goals.For example: Why do you want to work for this organization over others? This is a multilayered question, but the basic premise here is to find out whether you're passionate about them. Do you know about their work? And perhaps any further involvement they have in their community or charities? Are you aware of their competitors and challenges they're facing?Basic research preparation is key. Other questions may include: what's your favorite thing about working in this industry? What challenges are you looking for in this position? Etc.Situational Questions: I'll be honest here… these questions are hard. Sometimes they can be unpredictable, and the answers you prepared can suddenly become irrelevant. I was once asked to describe an occasion when I had come up with a creative solution to a problem. I could demonstrate my problem-solving skills, but what qualified as a ‘creative solution?' The key here is to stop, think, and offer an example of how you demonstrated that skill, what you did well, what you would do differently, and what the result was.When asked to describe an example, don't be afraid to say: “that's a good question, may I take a moment to think about it?” It is better to take the time to think than to rush into an answer.An example of this is: When have you taken the initiative and what was the result? Stop to think about the job; what skills are they looking for? Then think about the best example and answer the question including what you did, how people reacted, what you achieved, and what you would do differently.Other examples may include: Tell me about a time you led a team; or tell me about a time you disagreed with a manager.Weird and Wonderful Questions:These are very unpredictable, and as such, there is not much you can do to prepare for them. Just remember to show your personality, don't be afraid to tell a light hearted joke or demonstrate your ability to work well with others.An example may include: What do you like to do in your free time? On a question like this, you're being asked whether you have any passions or interests beyond work that make you attractive. Remember many organizations have clubs. If people are going to work with you day-in-day-out, they have to have reassurance that you're interesting! So talk about sports or talk about your friends.Other questions may include: If you could have one wish? If you could have a super power?.Management Questions:These questions aren't just for people looking for management jobs. They are an assessment of what you look for in a leader and, therefore, your ability to work with your supervisor. They can also be an evaluation of whether you have the potential to be a leader, remember organizations like to hire people who have long-term potential, especially if they're committing time and money to training you.Think about what a real leader demonstrates: delegation, strong communication, and an ability to encourage and motivate, then reflect on how you have shown these qualities and on examples of when your previous managers have shown them.For example, did you like your last supervisor? Unless the circumstances were truly exceptional you should always say yes; remember the D.C. community is a small world and word travels fast. Say what you liked about their leadership style, what you learned from them, and what you wanted more from them. Remember they are looking to see whether you will work well under their direction; you want to come across as somebody who can take instruction but also add to the team.Conclusive Questions:This is the most common mistake in any interview, yet it's so simple!There is only one conclusive question, and that is: Do you have any questions for me? Yes, you do!!This question is an interview question! And yet so many people don't answer. The interviewer wants to know if you've thought about the job, the company, and whether you're curious to know more. If you don't ask questions -- you don't care.Have five pre-set interview questions on hand with the expectation that a couple of them will be answered in the course of the interview. Then you should aim to ask two or three of them. They should be about the organization and its ethos, management, people, etc. Here are five questions I recommend:What are the biggest problems facing this department, and how do we solve them?Who are the people I will be working closest with, their names, and job titles?How do you measure success? Ask about activities outside the workplace e.g. social life, charity work.Do you have any further doubts about my ability to do this job that you would like me to address? (My personal favorite. Either the recruiter admits you're perfect for the job or you get the opportunity to address any underlying concerns still prevailing.)Finally, if you would like a list of questions you should consider please look at the Leadership Institute's Jobseeker Guide. We are here to assist you with your career goals so if you have an upcoming interview which you are nervous about, please get in touch with your questions. >
Preparing for Your Interview:  Failing to prepare is preparing to fail
Ben Woodward
January 16, 2017
Preparing for Your Interview: Failing to prepare is preparing to fail
Even the most confident people are nervous at interviews. Who wouldn't be? A lot is riding on a 30-minute conversation where your personality and career successes are scrutinized. I bet you can remember your worst interview; I do!I had researched thoroughly. And as always, I showed up 15 minutes early to scan through my notes one last time in the busy public lobby.Eventually, my name was called, and I took the endless walk down the oak paneled corridor to the interviewer's office. I sat down in the overheated room and faced my interviewer.It was tough! The questions were in-depth, and my interviewer was giving nothing away in his reactions. As the interview progressed, I was becoming more and more in need of water. My nerves and the heated room caused my throat to dry up, and I could barely speak. Too keen to impress, I did not dare ask for a drink, and I had not brought one with me.Approximately 20 minutes in, I could not speak at all, except in a suffocated whisper. The interviewer, now concerned for my wellbeing, got up from his desk and left the room in search of water. By the time he returned 10 minutes had passed, by which time he had no doubt forgotten anything he had liked about me.I didn't get the job. I was unprepared.I learned failing to prepare is preparing to fail!We can be our worst enemies in an interview. Sometimes we don't have to be tripped up by a difficult question because we are already rooting against ourselves. So here are some important ways you can prepare for your interview:Analyze the job description: This is obvious but crucial. Before you can determine what you want to put across in your interview, you need to know the details of the job in question. This means knowing the day-to-day responsibilities, the travel required, and who your supervisor will be. It also means you know the skills the interviewer will expect to see and even anticipate some of the questions.Learn about the organization and the department: Go to the organization's website and determine its mission statement and its current projects. You will almost certainly be asked about those. Also, review their social media, recent stories in the news, and their annual report. Ask yourself what you can offer them and how you have demonstrated a commitment to their values in the past. Be prepared to explain why you want to work for them over similar organizations.Basic competency questions: Consider the core skills required for the job and how you have demonstrated them in the past. The Leadership Institute's Job Seeker's Guide (pages 17 & 18) contains a list of competency questions you should be able to answer.Plan your outfit: Have your outfit picked out the night before. If you're indecisive about what looks good, this will give you time to work it out. Just don't change your mind in the morning! I recommend wearing business clothes you have worn before. Materials: Do not leave this until the last minute. Otherwise, you risk forgetting important documents. Take three copies of your resume printed on professional paper, two lists of references, letters of recommendation, writing samples, and take a notepad to jot down relevant information and anything you promise to send the interviewer as a follow-up.Logistics: Plan ahead when it comes to your interview. How are you getting there? How long will it take? What potential pitfalls could delay you? I recommend checking traffic reports and weather. If it's going to be hot for example, you don't want to sweat because you have walked a long distance. You may even want to allow time to change your clothes. Other: Think of anything else you may need, for example, something to eat or drink, or any medication. Interviews are stressful, but with preparation, you have every right to feel confident! If the employer has asked to interview you, it's because she or he thinks you are qualified to do the job; so don't sabotage yourself by failing to do basic preparation.For more great interview advice, check out LI's Job Seeker's Guide.>
Why Your Campaign Skills Make You an Asset
Ben Woodward
December 5, 2016
Why Your Campaign Skills Make You an Asset
The campaign is over. It's been a tough few months, and now you have a moment to breathe. I hope you have taken time to enjoy your victories -- or for those not as lucky, commiserate your defeats. But it is important to remember that life moves on and the time to think about your next career move is now. Whether you are looking for a job in the administration, think tanks, non-profits, or on the Hill, seize the moment. The current opportunities in the conservative movement are boundless. Following the election, hundreds of vacancies are opening up as people change jobs. If you're coming off a campaign, you may have gained skills which will make you an asset. The following skills you have learned could carry you to your dream job:Fundraising: During the campaign, you learned how to sell your candidate. You learned what to say in order to convince donors to help keep the campaign afloat. You probably accumulated these donors into a network you could rely on. To do this you may have planned events, written direct communications, created social media campaigns, and more. A development role in most movement organizations will require these skills. They will need you to be able to sell what they offer and convince donors why giving to their organizations will advance the movement and produce tangible results. Event Management: One of the toughest elements of a campaign is event management. This is your opportunity to reward your donors and volunteers, raise publicity, and raise money. You have booked venues and entertainment, managed a budget, and procured caterers. To do this you may have had a small team to run, you had to keep an eye on the details, and your organizational skills were pushed to the limit.Use these skills to your advantage. All organizations run events of some kind, and there is a high demand for competent event staff.Using Digital: Marketing in the private sector, organizations are constantly seeking new ways to sell their brands and identify new customers. The competition to remain at the forefront of digital marketing is intense. Campaigns are no different. During the campaign you used social media initiatives to target supporters and boost posts; you may have used Facebook Live for example. You may have used Photoshop software, mass emails, and explored your creative gifts.For conservative organizations to compete with the left, they have to hire talented, creative, and tech savvy candidates. That's where you come in.Planning: To fail to plan is to plan to fail. Working on a campaign means you planned how to use time, people, and money effectively. Planning ahead means you anticipate mistakes, you research, and most importantly you manage a budget accordingly.These skills are universally valued, and they will aid you in all aspects of your life.Communications & Marketing: Campaigns are a fierce battle between rivals who are not just selling themselves but discrediting their opponents. Learning to deliver your message effectively so that people identify your candidate with the right policies is essential. Learning how to handle negative information is also a requirement. You have to know when to discredit attacks, when to apologize for them, and when to ignore them. Learning to identify the target market of an organization, deliver your message, and manage negative information will make you an asset in the job market.Managing people: Management is tough; you have to be a leader, be able to give clear direction, and know your staff well enough to identify their strengths and weaknesses. A campaign is a team effort; and without a motivated army of committed activists, it will fail.Organizations in and out of the movement are no different. Success depends upon good leaders who get the best out of their teams. Personnel is Policy.GOTV: Getting out the vote is not so different from persuading clients and supporters of organizations to invest, purchase, donate, and volunteer. During the campaign, if you knew there were individuals who were likely to vote for your candidate, it was your job to make sure they voted.Many conservative organizations require those skills to motivate people to attend their events, sign up for correspondence, and actively participate in their campaigns.Remember, if you have worked on a campaign, you are a uniquely skilled individual! Some or all of these skills, and no doubt many more, will apply to you. Use them, be proud of them, and most importantly, use them to get a job!Ben Woodward works with the Leadership Institute's ConservativeJobs.com. He provides jobseekers with career advice and helps them find jobs in the conservative movement. >
Elections Have Consequences -- On Your Career
Ben Woodward
November 8, 2016
Elections Have Consequences -- On Your Career
The Leadership Institute trains thousands of conservatives each year; many currently have jobs in campaigns and other areas of the public policy process. These energetic, ambitious individuals are committed to learning how to win and to spreading conservative ideas. For some, however, particularly our younger graduates, there is only one concern at the front of their minds – their careers.Today's elections are sure to have a significant impact on the conservative job market, regardless of the outcome. If individuals are seeking employment within the movement, if they work in the movement, and especially if they currently work on a campaign, they should be planning for all possible circumstances. Elections have consequences.In careers, the most important Law of the Public Policy Process we live by is number 26: “Personnel is Policy.” An employer who wants to advance conservatism can achieve more by hiring qualified people who share those principles. On the other hand, a conservative job seeker can promote conservatism, even if the employer is not to the right, simply by moving the conversation away from the middle.If the new administration is friendly to conservative principles, then countless opportunities may arise; however, in the event that those in power do not sympathize with conservatives, job seekers should not be afraid to broaden their horizons.Politics is a bumpy road, and individuals may have to find a new career path at any time. It is important, therefore, to keep an open mind about careers. Conservatives should not be afraid to work outside the public policy process. For example, a sound conservative may be able to influence a company or non-profit simply by moving it to the right from within.For those currently involved in a campaign, they will learn a broad variety of skills that are applicable to multiple career paths. Learning to communicate messages effectively, networking, and organizing events are all skills which will prepare them for other careers.Too many people believe that simply being conservative and philosophically sound will guarantee their success. It is not enough, however, to simply have the right ideas. If conservatives want to succeed in the movement and broaden the influence of conservatism in the public policy process, then they must prepare for any eventuality.If you are seeking employment in the conservative movement, or you are looking to progress in your current position, attend the Leadership Institute's Conservative Career Workshop on November 15 & 16 by following the link here.>
The Leadership Institute Welcomes Fall Class of Interns
Andrew Sund
October 17, 2016
The Leadership Institute Welcomes Fall Class of Interns
Every fall, interns from all across the world descend on Washington, D.C. all looking to become the next generation of movers and shakers in the conservative movement. Many interns quickly realize the only moving and shaking they will be doing is from the office to the break room where they'll shake the perfect amount of sugar into the boss's coffee.While members of the Leadership Institute's 99th intern class may be seen in the break room grabbing a cup of coffee, it's because they need all the energy they can get as they enter the battlefield and fight for conservative principles.Dorcas Buzigire is an intern in the office of International Programs. She hails from the Democratic Republic of the Congo where she practiced law before coming to the United States. While attending a diplomatic mission function in Dallas, Dorcas met the former governor of a Congolese province who had ties with the Leadership Institute. In their discussion, the governor invited Dorcas to a Leadership Institute Wednesday Wake-Up Club Breakfast. While touring the Leadership Institute after the breakfast Dorcas said, "I had the feeling that I was home. I came back to LI to take the Youth Leadership School, applied for the internship, and got accepted." Dorcas will be assisting with trainings and recruitment for the office of International Programs and Grassroots Trainings, but for Dorcas, this internship means more. "I hope to apply the skills that I'm learning here to the political system in my home country and empower other young people, especially women, from my country to get involved in politics. I'm very thankful for the opportunity of expanding my network and learning American public policy."This internship differs from others in the D.C. area by developing successful young conservatives in three areas – marketplace skills, training, and career development mentoring.LI interns join a department where they work alongside Leadership Institute employees on real projects building skills they can then show to future employers. Interns are encouraged to take as many trainings as they would like and learn new skills to expand their resources. They also receive career development mentoring to help interns grow their networks and market themselves in a competitive workforce.The goal is that when LI interns finish the program, they are ready to join the workforce.Tyler Arnold is using his time at Campus Reform for just that.“Writing for the Leadership Institute's Campus Reform is giving me key experience in news reporting. Not only do I get to experience writing, but I also get to work with editors and reporters with professional experience who can help me develop my skills and build a good network to help me find a journalism job in the D.C. area.”While many of our interns are charging ahead on their career path, others are using this opportunity to explore what they want to do. Ashley Behm decided to intern at the Leadership Institute after completing her education in theatre: "I wanted to explore all the ways I could use the skills that the Lord has given to me as well as the skills I have learned along the way."Ashley works in the Events Department where she is responsible for behind the scenes preparations for all of LI's trainings and social events. While consuming from the "political buffet" of trainings she is also excited to "discover what God has placed me on this earth to do; an occupation that will bring Him glory!"Hannah Weeks, the Campus Leadership Program intern, had this to say about living at the Sacher House: "How many 20-somethings do you know sit up all hours of the night discussing foreign policy, politics, and culture? I know exactly nine others. I am having the experience of a lifetime because my internship extends outside of the traditional 9:00 to 5:00 format. I am constantly learning and networking and making some of the best friends I have ever had by having the privilege of living at the Sacher Intern House."Throughout the internship, the interns will host guest speakers, discuss conservative writings, and visit members of Congress. Most of the interns live together at the Sacher House located a short walk from the Steven P.J. Wood Building. Living in this house gives interns the opportunity to bond and to learn from each other.As my fall internship progresses, I encourage you to follow my intern class's journey by following the Leadership Institute's Facebook and Twitter, and the hashtag #LIinterns. You can also use this hashtag to share advice, to share spots to check out in the D.C. area, or just follow along for a good laugh every once in a while.If you are interested in applying for the LI Internship Program you can sign up now and be part of the best internship program in the D.C. area.>
Digital Communications Workshop Fills F.M. Kirby Training Center
Jami Averwater
September 6, 2016
Digital Communications Workshop Fills F.M. Kirby Training Center
Eight seconds. That's all. Either my email grabs the reader's attention, or I've lost them.Without a doubt, one of the best perks of being a Leadership Institute intern is the convenience of high-demand classes like “Digital Communications Workshop: Email Marketing.” In one full day, I learned from presentations filled with information on email communication by top strategists in the field.When done properly, email marketing has the potential to have forty times more return on investment than that of the major social media outlets, one speaker told us. If that announcement alone wasn't enough to convince me to pay close attention to the lectures which followed, the biographies of the speakers would do the job. Aidan Quinlan-Walsh, a Client Strategist for Engage, spoke on the topic of email acquisition. He taught us how toevaluate an offer to rent or purchase an email list;practice for acquisition campaigns; andmeasure the effectiveness of gathered analytics.His main goal of the presentation? Ultimately, he showed us how to take advantage of the platforms available to us in order to reach people successfully.Carolyn Kincaid, a copywriter, taught us how to cultivate subscribers using effective content. To do this, she recommends ditching the traditional “newsletter style” email blasts and capitalizing on the excitement of the person on the receiving end of the email.My fellow workshop attendees packing the classroom included non-profit employees from Washington, D.C. and the surrounding areas, college students from multiple regions of the U.S., and many Leadership Institute staff. As always, the list of lecturers at this workshop impressed me. Together, the speakers brought perspective, energy, and a combined experience of over six decades. I left the workshop that day feeling like I could tackle the world of digital communications, and I found myself using many of the tools I learned during the weeks of my summer internship. Jami Averwater was a summer intern in the External Affairs Department for the Leadership Institute. Find more digital workshops you can attend by visiting the Leadership Institute's Digital training page. The Leadership Institute offers over 47 types of training programs, working with more than 1,619 conservative student groups, and helping employers connect with conservative job seekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 175,000 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders. For more information, please visit www.LeadershipInstitute.org. >
Technology team works daily to keep programs running
Parker Johnson
August 18, 2016
Technology team works daily to keep programs running
In the digital age, information and mission-critical communications move fast. In the non-profit world, organizations like the Leadership Institute have gone almost entirely digital in our pivot to the information age and in doing so have greatly increased our ability to communicate with students, graduates, and donors across the nation.However, all of this decreased overhead and quick communication says little about the most integral part of a digital organization's vital asset: effective internal technical support.This past summer, I had the opportunity to intern with the Leadership Institute in the technology department. My biggest objective when coming to the Leadership Institute was to learn if my schooling thus far had prepared me professionally to work in a full-time position. Thanks to the incredibly welcoming and fun work environment, I now know for certain that I am ready to step into the career world when I graduate in May of 2017. During my internship, I was able to work on a variety of projects and touched on almost every facet our tech support team's responsibilities. The solid base education that I've garnered here has prepared me to step into a development role in the technology department at the Leadership Institute.As a member of the tech support team, I was also responsible for troubleshooting problems around the office. This allowed me to get out of the tech suite and introduce myself to the many talented and enthusiastic people working at the Leadership Institute. By helping with varied technological problems, I felt like a valued and useful member of the team.I am very grateful for the opportunity to work with the Leadership Institute this past summer. Not only has it further convinced me that the conservative movement is alive and well, but it has shown me that there are many opportunities to advance professionally with like-minded people. As a team, the technology and other departments can continue to work together for the advancement of our mission. Parker Johnson is a summer intern in the Techonology Department at the Leadership Institute. The Leadership Institute offers over 47 types of training programs, working with more than 1,619 conservative student groups, and helping employers connect with conservative job seekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 175,000 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders. For more information, please visit www.LeadershipInstitute.org.>
Total: 253