Capital in the Capital
Matthew Patterson
October 1, 2018
Capital in the Capital
Do you want to work in the Capitol or Capital? Many people often confuse the two words; with one letter of difference, it's an easy mistake. Whether you want to work in the capitol building or capital city, you should know about the different types of capital, each of which has a unique impact on your life.Social CapitalYour network is your net worth. We have all heard this phrase or a variation of it, particularly if you are in the D.C. area, and it cannot be truer. Not only does knowing more people expand your available opportunities when searching for a job, it can also make you more valuable to the job you have now. If you can pick up the phone and completely bypass the chain of command, you will be invaluable.via GIPHYOne of the most common issues people run into is how to effectively build your social capital and expand it outside of the workplace. One thing you should remember is that everyone you want to have a connection with is a person too. They have (fairly) normal lives, going out to eat, shopping, to the park, so on and so forth. Meeting people at these places, outside the office, can help lead to a great network in the Capital.Human CapitalLiving in the Capital can be a change of pace for those not used to the D.C. scene. As someone coming from a small town in East Tennessee, it was certainly a change for me. One aspect of your capital that can be left on the back burner during this transition is your human capital.via GIPHYYour human capital is your health, and with all the great places to grab a bite to eat or get a drink, it can be easy to not pay this much mind! However, those couple nights out and networking lunches can catch up with you. To help with this, D.C. offers many ways to help with your day to day health, including parks, trails, health food stores, and too many gyms to choose from! Its also important for your human capital to get some adequate sleep; you should never fall asleep at your office because of that Capital night life!Financial CapitalIf there is one thing everyone living in D.C. can agree on, it's not cheap! With some of the highest rent and cost of living in the country, it can be easy to find yourself on a strapped budget. It's important to save money, but up in the Capital it can be hard to justify putting that capital back in the bank.via GIPHYThe little things can help make this a lot easier such as taking the metro or bus instead of Uber, or shopping at Trader Joes instead of Whole Foods. Sure, it might not be as glamorous, but the pay off will be when you're not worried about those plane tickets home or that anniversary with your significant other.
10 Common Mistakes at Job Fairs, Trainings, and Networking Events
Carmen Diaz
July 6, 2018
10 Common Mistakes at Job Fairs, Trainings, and Networking Events
Last month the Conservative Partnership Institute held an Executive Branch Job Fair on Capitol Hill. I had the opportunity to work this event. More than 1000 job-seekers registered! I met men and women who drove hours and flew into D.C. that morning. Events such as these are fantastic opportunities to build your network, and who knows, maybe even secure a job. Unfortunately, many people make needless mistakes that leave a bad impression. Below are the top 10 common mistakes you should avoid.1. Not coming at allIf you can't afford to attend, or you're worried you may be underqualified, contact the manager of the event. Trust me, they want high attendance! Financial and travel resources may be available for students and interns. Similarly, if you registered but are unable to attend, it is thoughtful to notify managers beforehand.2. Incorrect name tag etiquetteName tags should be provided at events, but feel free to have a printed one always on hand. A tag should be placed on the upper right side of your chest with both your first and last name. 3. Dressing inappropriatelyIf a training doesn't specify dress code, business casual is the general rule of thumb. It is better to be overdressed than underdressed. Your next interviewer could be in the room.4. Typing your notesIt is proven that handwriting notes helps retain more information. For the sake of professionalism and to prevent distraction, avoid using your laptop and phone completely.5. Being afraid to ask questionsTake full advantage of the time you are given with experts. Write notes and questions throughout the lecture so your memory is fresh for the Q&A period. via GIPHY6. Not introducing yourself to staff and speakersI always remember friendly attendees who introduce themselves and shake hands. Saying a simple thank you shows respect to event organizers and speakers who've made the effort to be there.7. Sitting next to a friendInterns of the Leadership Institute are encouraged to attend as many trainings and workshops possible. There is only one rule: don't sit next to each other. Socializing with the guy you recognize from last week is a waste of a networking opportunity.8. Not completing evaluationsYou've invested time and money into attending an event hoping to learn something new. If you're unhappy or have suggestions, you owe it to yourself and your peers to give honest feedback. Organizers review comments carefully so programs continually improve.9. Treating this as a coffee dateNow is not the time to either share your life story or recite your resume. To a speaker who may be in a rush to another event or staff member who is busy managing the event, this is rude and will definitely be remembered for the wrong reasons. Introduce yourself, collect contact information, and follow up with an email.10. Not following upLike networking events, you haven't made a connection until you follow up. You may now schedule a personal meeting with your new contacts and ask the rest of your questions - but perhaps still refrain from sharing your life story.via GIPHY
Conservative on a Budget
Carmen Diaz
June 25, 2018
Conservative on a Budget
When you seek out a new job or internship, it's important to find a position that will value your time, education, and experience. While it never hurts to practice your negotiation skills, many people new to the workforce fail to realize it's not how much you make, it's how much you keep.Budgeting is often a foreign concept to students and young professionals, who mistakenly think money management requires either an accountant or mathematician. Today, resources for all levels of financial education are available, and I suggest you discover a method that is realistic and suitable for you. via GIPHY Here are three easy ways to manage your budget.Grab a calculator, and recall a conservative's favorite word: F.R.E.E.Fun (15%)For the sake of our own sanity, we all want to use our salary for fun. You work hard, and you deserve to indulge yourself. Remember, part of a successful internship is to enjoy your experience in a new city. Just be smart about it; an intern salary can disappear quickly.Return (5-10%)Set aside 5-10% of your income to “Return”, or give back, to your community. Give to your church, or find a cause personally significant to you. Within the conservative movement alone, there are countless foundations whose efforts rely on generous donors.Emergency (10%)10% of your earnings should be placed in a savings account, investment fund, or used to pay off existing debt. If your car suddenly needs a repair or you have a medical emergency, you will be grateful to have a fund readily available.Essential (65-70%)Calculate 65-70% of your monthly income to cover all your “Essential” expenses. Presumably, the majority of your income will go towards your groceries, housing, transportation, phone bill, etc. Acknowledge your financial weaknesses, and determine how to overcome them.Figure out how much those daily coffeehouse visits, lunches, dinners, etc. are costing you, and identify ways you can save money.Prepare your meals the day before; learn to love the office coffee; and find free events where food is served. Perhaps your comrades influence your lavish spending. Communication is key; inform your peers about your new habits and you should not only gain their respect, but may also encourage them to establish wise spending habits of their own.via GIPHY Create separate bank accounts for separate purposes.I recommend you have at least three separate bank accounts. At the beginning of each month, calculate your expenses i.e. food, rent, bills, and more. Remember, most of the money in your account has already been spent on essentials, so make sure your current account is an accurate portrayal of your spare income.Place 10% of your overall income into a separate savings account you can use later. You'll be glad it's there when an unexpected expense arise or you need a vacation. You third and final account is your current account, the money you really have left to spend on yourself this month. Start to develop responsible spending habits now to prepare your future self for any possible circumstance. No matter how impressive your income is, you'll find yourself financially struggling if you spend irresponsibly and don't keep track of where your hard-earned cash is going! Wise money management can determine your financial future as much as your income, so remember conservatives, live F.R.E.Evia GIPHY
Negotiate the Salary You Deserve
Ben Woodward
April 30, 2018
Negotiate the Salary You Deserve
Salary negotiation is among the most awkward topics of conversation to have with your boss or potential employer. Salary is a taboo subject, something to be kept private. The only problem is, when we are so used to avoiding it, we get out of practice when the topic emerges. Most would rather accept the first offer for fear of seeing a job offer or promotion withdrawn. However, negotiating your salary is important, not only to ensure you get the best compensation for your skills but also to set the trajectory for future raises. Remember, each increase in your salary is based on the previous number, meaning any raise you negotiate will benefit your career forever. via GIPHYHere are eight tips for a successful salary negotiation.1. Salary negotiation typically happens during a job offer or review.Your potential boss should begin the negotiation process when they offer you the job. At that point, they will offer you a number, and you will make a counter offer. Remember, you can also ask for a raise during a six month or annual review. If your boss doesn't automatically offer a review after an agreed amount of time, don't be afraid to request one. 2. There's more to consider about a job offer than money.When finding a new job, remember money is not the only factor to deliberate. You should consider whom you‘d be working for, your career trajectory, and how challenged you'll feel in the job. There is no sense in taking a well-paying job if your career stagnates after a couple of years because there is no room for growth. 3. You can negotiate outside of your salary.Even if your boss cannot budge on pay, you can negotiate elsewhere. For example, perhaps there is an option for a signing bonus, more vacation time, increased retirement contributions, or they can pay for skills training. 4. Do your research before going into the negotiation.Before going into negotiation, you should equip yourself with adequate knowledge so you can make reasonable requests. Look carefully at the sector you'll be working in; non-profits pay less than the private sector and campaigns pay less than non-profits. Also, carefully consider where you'll be living and the costs associated, as well as the size of the organization and the market value of your skills. via GIPHY5. Know where to look.To understand the salary you should be negotiating, there are many resources available to you. For jobs in the government or on Capitol Hill, sites like the Bureau of Labor Statistics and other public records can be helpful. Other sites like Glassdoor and Payscale.com are great for the private sector and non-profit jobs, and 990's are useful for non-profits too. Also, if you feel comfortable, have a conversation with your network. 6. Don't say a specific number, give a range.When you are asked about your salary requirements, give a range rather than a specific number. Remember, it's a negotiation, not a demand. If you're hoping for $50k per year, I recommend you say you would like to make $48k - $55k. If they can't meet your minimum, don't forget, you can negotiate other benefits. 7. Don't accept the first offer they give you; ask for time to consider.If you're nervous about the negotiation process, thank them for the offer and ask for a day/the weekend to think about it. When you speak with them the next day, be ready with your counter offer. Remember, when you're making your counter offer to emphasize your value, not why you need more money. 8. Stay positive and respectful.Remember to keep the negotiation civil. Consistently highlight your interest in the position and your excitement at the prospect of working there. Remember, you are going to have to work for this person after the negotiation is over. Finally, salary negotiations are awkward, but if you handle them correctly, you will come away with a better employment deal, which will continue to benefit your career for years to come.via GIPHY
The Next Generation: Episode 2018
Andrew Walter
March 14, 2018
The Next Generation: Episode 2018
Victory in politics is the direct result of the number and effectiveness of the activists behind it.This is one of the valuable lessons I took away from the Leadership Institute's flagship training, the Youth Leadership School, last November. It became clear to me that this is true, and the Leadership Institute is the best source to better understand political technology. This drove me to pursue an internship at the Leadership Institute.Like other interns at the Leadership Institute, I had read political books, assisted campaigns, and led a campus organization. But I knew the invaluable experience gained from the Leadership Institute would take my passion for advancing liberty to the next step and make me an effective leader in the movement.The professional skills, networking, and daily understanding of the most effective political technology means wherever my career takes me, LI has set me up with the confidence, skills, and knowledge to make liberty win.This semester's class is even bringing the expertise of LI to places across the globe. “I look forward to using my training in LI to help liberty flourish in my home country, Peru,” said development intern Javier Alban.The message of freedom is strong, and with the right training, conservatives can effectively make it a reality everywhere. If you would like to be part of the next generation of effective activists as a Leadership Institute intern, find out more about the program here.
Break the 4/5 rule in 2018!
Ben Woodward
January 8, 2018
Break the 4/5 rule in 2018!
In 2018, I'm going to break a rule. According to Business Insider, 80% of New Year's Resolutions will be broken by February. That's 4/5 of us who make a commitment to ourselves and don't follow through! It's not surprising when you think about it because most resolutions are wildly ambitious. We've all promised ourselves we're going to lose a lot of weight, quit our addictions, or become a millionaire. By the way, if you've achieved any of these things, good for you. Tell me your secret! via GIPHYMore importantly, most resolutions only develop with ourselves in mind. As such, because our resolutions are self-involved, we don't have anybody else invested in our success. Imagine how much more likely you would be to follow through if there was accountability from those around you.To break the 4/5 rule in 2018, I resolve to create something new at work.This New Year, your challenge is to sit down and identify how things could be better. How could you and your organization better accomplish your mission and better advance conservatism?via GIPHYThe best thing about working in the conservative movement is the tremendous potential to be an innovator and improve the way things are done. Here are three reasons you should resolve to create something new at work:Too often, professionals wait around for the formal authority to make a change. This, and fear of failure, prevent good ideas finding their way up the chain of command. Staff at non-profits like the Leadership Institute, however, are always encouraged to identify a need in the movement and fill it. Often this means going outside your formal job description and stretching yourself to take on new responsibilities. As you begin to challenge yourself, you will develop new skills.By doing this, you not only become an indispensable part of the team, but you also show your bosses you are serious about improving your organization and have the leadership skills necessary to drive innovation rather than just following orders.via GIPHYBut how do you create something new?Think about obstacles that make your job harder, or perhaps something you admire about another organization's way of doing things. Don't try to invent the wheel; just contribute tangible improvement.When you identify a way to contribute something new, and your boss is happy to proceed, prepare a full project proposal. It is essential you do your research and explain why the new idea is necessary, how you will define success, your strategy for implementation, and how you will overcome possible challenges.If your proposal is approved, identify staff who can support your new project and are willing to lend their time to ensure success. Set realistic goals for your project and keep your motivation. Remember, it's a marathon not a sprint!By making it your resolution to create something new at work, you will not only advance your career, but you will break the 4/5 rule. When you set yourself a goal that's well planned, your colleagues are invested in, and that helps others, you're far more likely to succeed.Be a rule breaker in 2018!
Conservative Heroes: Fourteen Leaders Who Shaped America, From Jefferson to Reagan
Morton C Blackwell
January 1, 2018
Conservative Heroes: Fourteen Leaders Who Shaped America, From Jefferson to Reagan
<< Download the full PDF here >>Dear Fellow Conservative,You and I are probably exceptions. Most people today have little understanding of America's founding principles of limited government or of how great American political leaders have devoted their lives throughout our history to defend those principles. Where can people learn about the heritage that made and kept our country great? Certainly not in most schools. Conservative Heroes: Fourteen Leaders Who Shaped America, From Jefferson to Reagan by Garland Tucker III tells readers exciting stories of conservatives from America's founding to the modern era. All were dedicated to the principles of limited government. At no cost to you, I have arranged for you to have online access to this outstanding book that tracks consistent conservative themes throughout American history and shows how fourteen outstanding leaders applied their philosophy through their political activities. The book in PDF form is without cost to you. << Download the full PDF here >> Like me, you may prefer to read physical books, but also like me, you can sometimes read interesting and useful books online. I knew that more people would read it online right now if I could distribute it at no cost. If you wish to own a Kindle or hard copy of the book, you can order either version from Amazon here.Garland Tucker, a successful businessman who is a deeply read student of history, tells the stories of fourteen leaders from Jefferson to Reagan. Some are famous; others are important but hardly remembered at all.You probably know other conservatives who share your interest in conservative principles. If so, please forward to them my no-cost offer of this highly educational, 202-page book.Cordially,Morton BlackwellPresidentThe Leadership Institute P.S. If some friends or other people you know should learn more about conservative heroes, please send them this PDF. Or order a copy for them here.
Merry Christmas from the Leadership Institute!
Leadership Institute
December 25, 2017
Merry Christmas from the Leadership Institute!
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Count Your Blessings: LI Grad New Missouri Speaker Pro Tem
Thomas Bingham & Carol Wehe
November 22, 2017
Count Your Blessings: LI Grad New Missouri Speaker Pro Tem
Every day conservatives fight to gain control of Congress to stop the radical left agenda. It is imperative to elect principled conservatives to office at every level of government. That's why, at a time when we're supposed to count our blessings, I give thanks for representatives like Elijah Haahr in Missouri, and the many other principled conservative Leadership Institute (LI) graduates already in office who work to make our country a better place. Elijah realized the importance of putting conservatives into office early on. "Raised in a conservative family, I started volunteering on political campaigns at the age of 10,” Elijah said. Twenty years later, at just 30 years old, Elijah ran for and won his first campaign. He decided to run for an open seat in the Missouri House of Representatives, District 134 in 2012. After winning his primary with more than 20% of the vote, he went on to win the general election against James Owen. Now, at 35, he still holds his elected seat, is an active member of the Springfield Metropolitan Bar Association, and just this fall was elected to be the next Speaker of the House starting in January 2019. Why is it important that Elijah Haahr is so successful at winning elections and being an effective representative? It's not easy. To be an effective candidate, he had to learn how to campaign, fundraise, develop his message, and anticipate negative coverage. As the new Speaker Pro Tem, Elijah Haahr said he greatly benefited from Leadership Institute trainings and his experience working on campaigns. “My parents discovered the Leadership Institute, and I attended several LI courses as a teenager,” Elijah said. “The lessons learned on running and winning campaigns, along with the philosophical foundation LI provided, I still use in my campaigns and political work today." Not only was Elijah a student at Leadership Institute as a teenager, he took LI's Future Candidate School in 2009, just three years before he ran and won in 2012. Future Candidate School is a four-day boot camp which prepares conservatives to run for office. Students at Future Candidate School learn how to get involved, drive support for an issue or candidate, organize activists in large or small groups for maximum impact, communicate more effectively, use the media to help advance an issue, build personal leadership skills, abilities, and confidence. Elijah Haahr is not the only Leadership Institute graduate to get elected to public office. More than 36 Leadership Institute graduates are serving members of the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate. And 504 Leadership Institute graduates are members of State Legislatures, along with Elijah. So, while you're finding leaders, family, and friends to be thankful for this week, you can also consider taking the same leap Elijah did to learn how to effectively campaign and then to run and win public office. The next Future Candidate School will be held December 5-8, 2017. To register for the Future Candidate School click here. Join me in congratulating Elijah Haahr on his new role as Speaker of the House in January 2019, and in giving thanks this Thanksgiving for the hardworking conservatives willing to serve as elected leaders.
David and Goliath - Student Activist in Michigan Fights University and Wins
Cheyenne Plott
November 16, 2017
David and Goliath - Student Activist in Michigan Fights University and Wins
If there was ever a David and Goliath story played out in student activism today, it is the story of Angela Little, former President of the Students for Life chapter at Eastern Michigan University. Most college students in their final year are focused on the job hunt, finding a career, and tying up loose ends in their coursework. In her final year, however, Angela stepped up to the role of President during an ongoing lawsuit the Students for Life chapter filed against Eastern Michigan University. Born and raised in a Christian home in Michigan, Angela always had a strong belief in the sanctity of life. When a friend of hers helped establish the Students for Life group at EMU during her freshmen year, Angela jumped in immediately. Angela started out by helping her friend pass out flyers and promote events on campus, and she soon became heavily involved. The Students for Life chapter wanted to bring the Genocide Awareness Project (GAP) to campus. The GAP is a portable, visual display which draws parallels between abortion in the 21st century and historical genocide. When the Students for Life chapter applied to receive funding for the project, however, the university declined to provide it. According to the Alliance Defending Freedom, who represented the Students for Life group in the lawsuit, the university considered the project too “biased” and “controversial” to fund despite the fact that a substantial portion of annual student fees are intended to fund student organization activities and programming. Law #41 of Morton's Laws of the Public Policy Process states: “In moments of crisis, the initiative passes to those who are best prepared.” In this case, the initiative passed to Angela as she assumed the role of President. She turned to the Leadership Institute for help. The Leadership Institute invited Angela to attend the 5-day Student Leadership Conference in Arlington, VA where she learned how to petition and how to conduct interviews in the press. Between the ongoing lawsuit and an increase in the number of campus events they hosted, the Students for Life chapter was garnering media attention, and it was in these moments that Angela utilized her interview training. Angela's LI training was not only a beneficial experience but connected her with other conservative student activists across the country. She was encouraged during the training to hear what other pro-life groups were doing on their campuses. The ideas and friendships shared during this training were a source of support when she went back to EMU's campus. After a lengthy legal battle, the Students for Life chapter won the case and the university revised its funding by-laws. The small pro-life student group came out victorious over the university's liberal bias and soon swelled in membership. Angela recognizes that her student activism experience “would not have been the same” without her LI training and the connections she made there. She now shares her story in her professional life with students who will soon be going off to face similar battles. Angela teaches math and science at a private Christian high school. There, she's able to share her story with her students and encourage them in preparation for college. “Life's going to be hard when you get to college,” she tells them. She encourages them saying: “You need to stand up for your beliefs because if you don't, who else will?” Angela's story proves that even a small student group, mighty in principle, can triumph over the giant of liberal bias in the university setting.
It’s Not Just Who You Know, But Where You Go
Ben Woodward
October 31, 2017
It’s Not Just Who You Know, But Where You Go
Some people are social butterflies; they don't just know how to work a room, but where to be and when. Cities like Washington, D.C. have events going on all the time. Many of them are great opportunities to meet new people, learn, and get free food! But while there are a ton of great events going on, how do you know which ones are going to be the most useful? Obviously, you can't be everywhere at once and after a long, busy work week, going to a happy hour can be the last thing on your mind. Knowing what events are going on and which ones you should prioritize is an important skill. So what resources are available to you? Newsletters Do your research and identify which organizations exist in your field and whether they are based in your town/city. If they are, subscribe to their newsletters. Remember that when organizations hold events, they want high attendance. That means they'll be pushing their events by email. Don't worry; I know constant emails can get frustrating. Once you have identified the organizations that are providing useful opportunities, you can unsubscribe from the rest. I personally recommend ConservativeJobs.com, Americas Future Foundation, Heritage Job Bank, which were very helpful to me when I first moved to Washington, D.C. Social Media Within a few months of moving into a new field, you will discover events through Facebook invites. Even if that is not the case, you will most likely see the events others are going to and decide if they are of interest. As you meet new people, the number of invitations you receive will increase. In the early stages, make sure you ‘like' every organization that interests you and you will be notified of their events. Facebook will even show you event recommendations based on your interests. You can also follow an organization on Twitter to learn more about their events. When I'm asked if social media is essential to a person's career, I say yes. By not having social media you will likely be excluded from events by those who depend on it to organize their affairs. I recommend following organizations like the Leadership Institute, Young American's for Liberty, the Charles Koch Institute, and American's for Prosperity to begin with. Eventbrite Most of us have been invited to an event through Eventbrite, or have been forwarded to the site to book tickets. But Eventbrite is also an incredibly useful way to keep in touch with the events happening in your area of interest. Whether your location is your priority, price, or issue area, Eventbrite is a great way to know what's going on. When you go on Eventbrite, you can search by category and location. I recommend searching the “Government” category, which then gives you the chance to see events from Federal, to policy, or party political. Many of these events are career focused. Friends and Coworkers I saved the best until last. Word of mouth. Ultimately, no website is going to know your interests and your ambitions better than your friends and colleagues. Make it known you want to go to more events and get to know more people in your career area. By doing so, you are far more likely to be invited to events as and when your friends discover them. In many ways, you'll find you have a team of people searching out good events for you just by the nature of being in a social group. Make sure you return the favor and invite others to events too, and then people will feel more inclined to assist. Remember, even if you are an outgoing person who makes connections easily, you still have to put in some work to hunt down events and grow your network within the movement. Happy hunting!
Social Conservatives “must win in politics”
Abbey Lee
October 25, 2017
Social Conservatives “must win in politics”
“Politics is a shaping part of culture. It's where we determine what's good, what's true, what's just, what's right, what's moral, and it's where we determine what's beyond the pale and acceptable.” On October 4, Terry Schilling visited the members of the Leadership Institute's Wednesday Wake-up Club Breakfast to speak frankly about progress in the social conservative movement. Terry, the Executive Director of the American Principles Project, has worked in many areas of the nonprofit world, including communications, development, and grassroots. An Illinois native, he has worked with several state and local candidates, among them his father, Rep. Bobby Schilling. Addressing the attendees, he spoke from experience in the work he has dedicated to the cause. He has witnessed how abortion has become more and more acceptable in American culture simply because it has been made legal. Terry urges those who stand for traditional, conservative values to support and invest in those causes. “Social conservatives are in danger of losing everything, and it's because we've abdicated our duty and responsibility to invest in politics,” Terry said. For too long, the right has merely defended themselves against attacks from the left. Social conservatives must do more than educate themselves and vote. It is their duty to play offense and invest in the future of the conservative movement to maintain the traditional values held dear. He parts with impactful words, saying, “Not only can we win, but we must win in politics because the future of America depends on it.” Leadership Institute's Wednesday Wake-up Club Breakfast hosts conservative speakers and attendees for breakfast on the first Wednesday of each month. To become a breakfast club member, visit this link.
Your elevator pitch -- 20 seconds to make an impression
Kate Lipman
October 16, 2017
Your elevator pitch -- 20 seconds to make an impression
Picture the scenario; you are an intern or junior staffer in the elevator of your work building, and a Vice President walks in… what do you do? Do you burst into tears, fall on your knees and beg for a job? Or do you seize the moment and deliver your elevator pitch? This brief but persuasive 20-second pitch is your chance to engage a potential employer in conversation in a confident but respectful way. By using this opportunity correctly, you can make a strong impression and turn them into a lasting connection. Here are some tips for your elevator pitch. Be natural. If you try to hero worship them, they won't take you seriously. Likewise, if you deliver the speech like you've been practicing it in the mirror, they won't take you seriously. Be respectful but confident. If you want a job working for them somewhere down the line, you have to earn their respect. A great way to do this is to bring up a topic of mutual interest. Perhaps you saw them speak, or read one of their articles. Draw from that to start a conversation. Instead of “Wow it's amazing to meet you, I'm a huge fan of… and I've always wanted to work there.” Try “Hi… my name is… and I work at… I attended your recent talk on… and you made some really interesting points.” Don't ask them for anything. Most executives are experienced enough to separate those legitimately interested in them and their organizations from the users simply trying to find their next job or promotion. Just like with any networking opportunity, the goal is to establish a relationship and then you can work on turning them into a connection. Be genuine and show a legitimate interest in them. By getting their business card, you can follow up and ask them for coffee later. Instead of: “I saw that there's a vacancy at… I'd like to apply; would you give the recruiter my resume?” Try: “How did you come to work in…? I am interested in pursuing a career in this field and would value any advice you have.” Let them talk. Most people enjoy talking about themselves, which can be both an advantage and a disadvantage. By letting someone talk about himself or herself, you are demonstrating a legitimate interest in them and allowing the conversation to flow naturally rather than simply pitching yourself. The disadvantage of this can be that by letting them do all the talking, you don't get the chance to impress. Try to establish a connection with what they're saying and something you have accomplished. For example, if they talk about public policy, try to contribute to the conversation and offer an informed opinion. Instead of: “That's interesting… yes… I understand.” Try: “That's a good point; I have recently been working on a similar project to…” Swap business cards and follow up. If possible, you should aim to swap business cards at the end of the conversation. Remember, it is more important to get their business card than it is to give them yours. By getting their card, you give yourself the opportunity to follow up and turn a chance encounter into a real connection. Instead of: “Here is my business card, if you're free for coffee sometime I'd love to learn more.” Try: “Do you have a business card on you? I would be very interested to follow up with you can continue this conversation at your convenience.” When chance encounters occur with your role models, it can be a daunting experience. If you show confidence, sell yourself, and show a legitimate interest, you will be able to use the opportunity to secure a lasting connection.
Christian Libertarian Environmentalist Capitalist Lunatic Farmer Fights Big Gov't
Abbey Lee
September 21, 2017
Christian Libertarian Environmentalist Capitalist Lunatic Farmer Fights Big Gov't
The first Wednesday of September, conservatives from all backgrounds gathered to hear Joel Salatin. Joel, a self-proclaimed Christian libertarian environmentalist capitalist lunatic farmer, offered a refreshing perspective at the September Wednesday Wake-up Club Breakfast. He shared stories about his own issues with government intervention as a small-scale Virginia farmer. “Food, the water we drink, and the air we breathe are in common.” Often, conservatives and libertarians focus on individualism, but Joel, co-owner of Polyface Farm, argues that food freedom and the danger of government intervention in small farms and businesses is of concern to us all. He shared one story about a time when friends and neighbors urged Joel to create and sell what he called “Polyface hot pockets” or meat pies made from livestock on his farm. When the inspectors discovered he didn't have a bathroom in the industrial kitchen designed to make the hot pockets, he was told he couldn't sell them at all. Joel explains, “Whenever a regulatory context is prejudicial against ‘small,' it is a bad regulation.” He has a product, and consumers who are willing to buy the product, but government regulations halt progress in its tracks by forcing him -- a small business owner -- to build a $30,000 bathroom. Joel witnesses firsthand how regulations discourage entrepreneurial spirit and keep consumer-desired products out of the market. Watch Joel's entire talk here and join us at our next breakfast with Terry Schilling, the executive director of American Principles Project, on October 4.
Caught Between a Job Offer and a Job Offer!
Ben Woodward
September 18, 2017
Caught Between a Job Offer and a Job Offer!
If you're searching for a job and finding the process difficult, I'm willing to bet that the prospect of competing job offers would be a dream come true. Let's be honest, it's hardly a bad situation to find yourself in. When the situation arose for me, I regret how I handled it. Fresh out of university, I was desperate to get a job in the UK Parliament. When I successfully got to the final round of interviews I was excited. My instincts told me the interview had been a big success. We even bonded over our mutual love of F1 racing. After being told to expect a decision within a week, I was contacted at the same time by a friend offering me a different opportunity. With my heart set on Parliament, I waited. Four weeks later I received the dreaded email telling me that I had been unsuccessful. The alternative opportunity my friend had sent me was now being advertised. Thankfully I got the job. But I made a bad first impression by failing to be honest and talk to both parties. Here is what you should do if you're ever caught in this position. Get yourself a written job offer. The job offer is not technically made until it's formally written out. If you're given a verbal job offer, thank them and tell them how excited you are at the prospect of working for them. Then ask them to put the offer in an email. Explain the situation. Once you have the written offer, be honest. Tell them that you are very excited about the opportunity but that you have another interview scheduled and would like time to weigh up your options. If they tell you they need an answer urgently then you'll have to decide whether it is worth the risk. My advice is to take the job offer if it's an opportunity you think you would still enjoy and benefit from. If you have more time, explain the situation to your other potential employer. You may find that the interview for the next job helps make your decision before you have to discuss other offers. You will likely get a sense of your success, whether the organization is somewhere you want to work, and whether you think the other offer provides a better opportunity. If you find that your instincts were right, and you do want to work at the second organization, tell them. At the end of your interview, be honest and explain that they are your preferred choice however you have another offer pending and see whether they can commit to a decision in a shorter amount of time. One last thing... It's not an easy situation to find yourself in. Ultimately, you will have to decide whether the risk is worth compromising your current offer. By taking these steps and being honest and respectful to the competing employers, you can help mitigate the risks and hopefully give yourself the time you need to secure both offers.
Seize the Internal Promotion
Ben Woodward
August 28, 2017
Seize the Internal Promotion
If you work at a smaller organization, your next promotion doesn't entirely depend on your performance. At a small organization, you may have to wait for a vacancy to arise – or create your own position from nothing. There's one thing you can be sure of though, if you don't ask, you don't get. When you hear the whisperings you've been waiting for, and the person one step above you in the chain of command is about to move on to their next opportunity, how do you approach the situation? There's a lot to think about. Has that person announced it yet? Who else will be applying? How are you going to pitch yourself as their successor? Don't rely on others to recognize you. If you don't ask, you don't get! To ensure you are in prime position, think about the following five angles. Who is hiring for the role? The difficulty with applying for promotion is that there has always been a tier of seniority between you and your potential new boss. This means that your access to them was limited, but now you're asking this person to take a big chance on you. Find out about the person hiring, what do their employees think of them? What qualities do they value most in their team? Answering these questions will give you the framework to prepare your pitch. Who will recommend you? Whether or not you know the individual hiring for the position, asking for recommendations is essential. If the staffer hiring is senior in your department it is likely they will already be aware of your work. However, it never hurts to remind them through people they trust. If you are applying for a different department, the manager will be far more likely to choose you over employees he knows well if he has heard recommendations for you from respected colleagues. What's your case? Just like with any job application you should have a clear understanding of the role you will be performing and why your previous accomplishments make you a prime candidate. Study the job description carefully and prepare a formal written application for the job. Request a formal meeting. This is your opportunity to sit down with the hiring manager and discuss the role seriously. This is not your chance to ask for any special favors, but to sit down and seriously explain that you would like to be considered for the role and to hand over your formal application. Remember that just because you work at the organization you are not entitled to the role. You should be prepared to interview at a later date. What's your pitch? If you are invited to interview for the position following your formal application, remember to treat it as you would any other interview. Your advantage however is your in-depth understanding of the organization and all of the respected colleagues who can vouch for you. Be confident in what you've achieved, what you plan to achieve, and you can score that well-earned promotion!
LI Graduate Makes a Difference for D.C. Kids
Autumn Campbell
August 25, 2017
LI Graduate Makes a Difference for D.C. Kids
Ashley Carter set the bar high in 2016. As the only Republican D.C. elected last year, she is also the only Republican woman elected to this at-large seat in D.C. history. Ashley's passion for her community combined with her upbeat personality set her on track to win last election season. Ashley Carter is a long-time graduate of the Leadership Institute. I followed up with Ashley after she took LI's TV Workshop, On-camera. Since she won the election, Ashley has addressed educational issues through her three-pronged approach: (1) Raise the graduation rate; (2) Push for more career training and technical education resources; and (3) Add more trained volunteers and nonprofit resources to the classroom. School choice is a priority for Ashley. Over the next four years, Ashley plans to push for excellence in education through more school voucher opportunities. Ashley credits her success to listening to the members of her community. “It's less about party and more about the community,” Ashley says. If implementing conservative education policy isn't enough, Ashley stays active through her volunteer work, training for a half marathon, and serving as Director of Coalitions at the Independent Women's Forum. Ashley offered advice to conservative activists: “You're going to face adversity, but you just need to keep going. Had I stopped, I wouldn't be where I am today.” While Ashley continues the conservative fight for Washington, D.C.'s education, what's her challenge to fellow conservatives? “Don't shy away from your beliefs!” This is an update on LI's August 24, 2016 blog post. Read this blog post here. The Leadership Institute offers more than 47 types of training programs, working with more than 1,876 conservative student groups, and helping employers connect with conservative job seekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 188,000 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders. For more information, please visit www.LeadershipInstitute.org.
Dr. William Murphy -- When LI Grads Succeed, Conservatism Succeeds
Ben Woodward
August 23, 2017
Dr. William Murphy -- When LI Grads Succeed, Conservatism Succeeds
Often in politics, there are doers, and there are thinkers. The doers knock on doors, build organizations, and lobby for their movement. The thinkers research and compose policy proposals; they're academics who shape the way we see the world. Both are assets to the conservative movement, and both are necessary to succeed. Dr. William Murphy encompasses both qualities. A Professor at the New England Institute of Technology, Dr. Murphy specializes in U.S. foreign policy and national security. He is a veteran, Harvard graduate, former President at Peak Performance Technology Partners, and was Finance Director at Bateman for Congress in 1992 where he first met Leadership Institute President, Morton Blackwell. But it's his next project that's potentially his most exciting yet! After discussing his plans with Morton, Dr. Murphy intends to establish an advocacy based organization which will campaign to make Congress more efficient at requesting information from the executive branch. Good Government Now will promote four key proposals for strengthening legislative oversight and investigative capabilities: Rule of information requests and subpoenas, create inherent contempt enforcement procedures, resurrect and reinvigorate criminal contempt enforcement, and increase civil contempt enforcement statute. Dr. Murphy says that the Leadership Institute has been invaluable in his career. Not only through the skills he has learned in the many trainings he attended, such as LI's Television and Digital Communications Workshops, and Fundraising Training, but also because he can network with LI's expert faculty who have provided him with the guidance to succeed. “I have benefitted immeasurably from LI's outstanding training programs. LI's presidential transition support operations, as well as the excellent coaching and career services it offers, are invaluable resources." Besides the army, Dr. Murphy says that there is no organization he feels such loyalty for than LI. “Everyone there is unselfish and dedicated to the cause,” he said. The Leadership Institute is proud to call Dr. William Murphy a graduate. Countless successes have been won by the Leadership Institute's 189,476 graduates. Some have been elected to the United States Senate and House of Representatives, others work for the Administration, lead nonprofits, and are winning for conservatism across the world. When LI graduates succeed, the conservative movement succeeds. Leadership Institute offers more than 47 types of training programs, works with more than 1,878 conservative student groups, and helps employers connect with conservative job seekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 189,476 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders.
Dress for Success
Annamarie Rienzi
August 14, 2017
Dress for Success
On Monday, August 7, more than 30 women came to the Leadership Institute (LI) to network, shop, and learn how to dress for success. Partnering with the Independent Women's Forum and the Ladies of Liberty Alliance, LI gathered enough professional clothing for each attendee to take home at least one outfit. In addition, attendees heard from Sonya Gavankar, former Miss D.C., and multimedia host and content creator. Her lecture was filled with great tips and tricks to help young ladies navigate professional fashion without being overwhelmed. She broke down a lot of misconceptions about office fashion choices and entertained the audience with her anecdotes. Here are three key lessons learned about professional dressing for women. Be honest with yourself about what looks good on you. Sometimes what you think looks good may not, in fact, be the most flattering. Wearing tight clothes runs the risk of not being taken seriously in the workplace. Whereas wearing baggy clothes runs the risk of looking sloppy. You should find clothes which are work appropriate and also give you confidence. While shopping, surround yourself with friends who are honest and frank with you. Take turns trying on new work outfits and giving feedback. You don't have to sacrifice personal style to look professional. As long as your clothes are work appropriate, certain liberties can be taken to tailor clothes to your style. An excellent example of this is to dress professionally but look for ways to incorporate a splash of color into your outfit. This may be an accessory or wearing a brightly colored jacket. Don't dress for work how you'd dress for the weekend. Dress codes are more relaxed at organizations than they used to be, which means there's some ambiguity about what women can wear. Because you never know when a meeting may be sprung on you, make sure you don't overstep the boundary between smart casual and casual. If in doubt, look for a female executive at your organization who you admire, and who dresses well. Use her for inspiration. Attendees were grateful to hear Gavankar's advice. They were especially thankful for her time as she stayed during the “shopping” period and reviewed the ladies' outfit choices as they tried on clothes. The unclaimed clothes were donated to the not-for-profit organization, Dress for Success, which provides professional development and attire to women.
How to Communicate With Your Liberal Friends and Neighbors – Without Alienating Them
Autumn Campbell
August 3, 2017
How to Communicate With Your Liberal Friends and Neighbors – Without Alienating Them
We've all been there. We've been unfriended on Facebook during the 2016 election cycle, forced into an awkward political discussion over Thanksgiving dinner, or attacked on Twitter for making a political comment. Yes, the current political climate is hostile; but there is a way to communicate effectively without losing all of your friends. Keep your point clear and concise. Rambling will get you nowhere in a heated discussion. Instead, stay clear-headed and stay on the topic at hand. Use personal stories and experiences. Many you converse with will find it hard to argue against your personal experience. Tie your experience in with why you believe what you believe. You can then back up your experience with facts and statistics. Meet emotion with emotion. Do not shy away from empathy. You can stand your ground while being empathetic to the concerns of the other person. Although these three steps seem simple, you'll be surprised at how calm and level-headed you'll feel at the end of the conversation. Who knows? Your friend may even see your point of view! Leadership Institute offers more than 47 types of training programs, works with more than 1,868 conservative student groups, and helps employers connect with conservative job seekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 187,207 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders.
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