LI's 2016 Fall Field Representatives Deployed on Campuses in 38 States
Kyle Baccei
September 20, 2016
LI's 2016 Fall Field Representatives Deployed on Campuses in 38 States
The left is hard at work to remove any expression of conservative principles on campus. Even when you think it can't get any worse, liberal college professors and administrators find new levels of shamelessness and fury. Their commitment would be impressive -- if it were not so dangerous. That is why each fall the Leadership Institute trains and deploys Field Representatives to college campuses across the country. This fall, 32 Field Representatives are now deployed in 38 states. These highly trained conservative activists work with students to promote and defend their conservative principles. They will help students organize conservative college groups on college campuses. Here are some of the ways Field Representatives can help conservative college students. Contact your regional field coordinator, and see how they can help you reach your goals on campus.
Senator Jim Banks -- His Campaign's
Mari Vogel
September 13, 2016
Senator Jim Banks -- His Campaign's "Secret Weapon"
Jim Banks has shown a dedication to service throughout his life. As a father of three, a state Senator, and a Navy Reservist, he has proven himself a strong and value-oriented leader. “There is a lot of pressure to go along with the majority sentiment, but I will not go back on the pledge I made to my constituents,” said Senator Banks. As the State Senator for the 17th district of Indiana, he has continually been a voice for conservative principles. Next, he hopes to continue his service to Indiana as a member of Congress. While in the senate, Senator Banks has served on numerous committees, most notably the Senate Veteran Affairs and the Military committee. He believes this experience, coupled with his military service, could provide a unique perspective to the Congressional Armed Services Committee if elected in the fall. Senator Banks fought in a hotly contested primary this spring due to the number of other well-funded candidates and the coinciding presidential nomination which drew in many more voters. However, due to his knowledgeable volunteers (several Leadership Institute graduates) and lean campaign strategies, he was able get his message out and win the election. Another thing which helped now Senator Banks through the election was his family, which he referred to as the campaign's “secret weapon.” His wife, Amanda, was able to play a unique role in the campaign because of her own political experience. As a Navy Reserve Supply Corps officer, Jim was called to Afghanistan from 2014 until 2015. While Jim was serving in Afghanistan, Amanda took over his seat in the state Senate. During her time in office, she worked on the Veterans Affairs committee and the Education committee, where she helped author and sponsor many bills. She also co-authored several bills in defense of the unborn. “Public servants cannot separate who they are from what they do,” she says, “so the various vocations I have in life as a mother, a military wife, and a conservative activist all come to the forefront when considering the issues facing our state." If he wins the election in November, Senator Banks is ready to fight for conservative values in Congress. “I believe we need to go back to our roots and start building support around conservative solutions for our current public policy challenges,” he said. Instead of being the “opposition party,” he sees the importance of bringing conservative proposals and ideas to the table. Jim credits the Leadership Institute with providing a solid foundation for him as he began getting involved in politics. Thanks to the Grassroots Activist School and Youth Leadership School, he made connections which allowed him to work with a member of Congress and run a Mayoral campaign very early in his career. “The LI program didn't just provide me with the knowledge and skills I would need to make a difference on behalf of candidates I would work with," said Senator Banks, "but it helped me connect with people who would have an important role in my career down the line.” Mari Vogel was a summer intern in the Grassroots Department for the Leadership Institute. The Leadership Institute offers over 47 types of training programs, working with more than 1,619 conservative student groups, and helping employers connect with conservative job seekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 175,000 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders. For more information, please visit www.LeadershipInstitute.org.
Digital Communications Workshop Fills F.M. Kirby Training Center
Jami Averwater
September 6, 2016
Digital Communications Workshop Fills F.M. Kirby Training Center
Eight seconds. That's all. Either my email grabs the reader's attention, or I've lost them. Without a doubt, one of the best perks of being a Leadership Institute intern is the convenience of high-demand classes like “Digital Communications Workshop: Email Marketing.” In one full day, I learned from presentations filled with information on email communication by top strategists in the field. When done properly, email marketing has the potential to have forty times more return on investment than that of the major social media outlets, one speaker told us. If that announcement alone wasn't enough to convince me to pay close attention to the lectures which followed, the biographies of the speakers would do the job. Aidan Quinlan-Walsh, a Client Strategist for Engage, spoke on the topic of email acquisition. He taught us how to evaluate an offer to rent or purchase an email list; practice for acquisition campaigns; and measure the effectiveness of gathered analytics. His main goal of the presentation? Ultimately, he showed us how to take advantage of the platforms available to us in order to reach people successfully. Carolyn Kincaid, a copywriter, taught us how to cultivate subscribers using effective content. To do this, she recommends ditching the traditional “newsletter style” email blasts and capitalizing on the excitement of the person on the receiving end of the email. My fellow workshop attendees packing the classroom included non-profit employees from Washington, D.C. and the surrounding areas, college students from multiple regions of the U.S., and many Leadership Institute staff. As always, the list of lecturers at this workshop impressed me. Together, the speakers brought perspective, energy, and a combined experience of over six decades. I left the workshop that day feeling like I could tackle the world of digital communications, and I found myself using many of the tools I learned during the weeks of my summer internship. Jami Averwater was a summer intern in the External Affairs Department for the Leadership Institute. Find more digital workshops you can attend by visiting the Leadership Institute's Digital training page. The Leadership Institute offers over 47 types of training programs, working with more than 1,619 conservative student groups, and helping employers connect with conservative job seekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 175,000 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders. For more information, please visit www.LeadershipInstitute.org.
Recent graduate uses Leadership Institute skills to launch campaign in Washington, DC
Jami Averwater
August 24, 2016
Recent graduate uses Leadership Institute skills to launch campaign in Washington, DC
It is safe to say Ashley Carter stays busy as the Grassroots Director for the Independent Women's Forum. This role leads her around the country speaking on many vital topics, including the importance of women running for public office. In fact, the organization has recently expanded to 10 states where they advocate heavily for issues of importance to women and families. Ashley covered these topics on a panel at the 2016 Republican National Convention. Now, Ashley Carter has announced her candidacy for DC Board of Education member At-Large. To recruit volunteers for her campaign, Ashley shared with me she had success using Leadership Institute's free job placement service, ConservativeJobs.com. "I have found LI to be a wonderful resource," she said. "And I continue to flourish in my career and now my campaign because of the Institute." In preparation for her campaign, she participated in both Leadership Institute's Campaign Management School and Future Candidate School. In the picture below, Ashley stands in the front row with a group of fellow Leadership Institute graduates at the Campaign Management School. "Being immersed in a deep learning about campaigns with other candidates and leaders who share my beliefs helped to turn an idea about becoming a candidate into reality." Before beginning her role with Independent Women's Forum, Ashley attended the Women's Leadership Workshop and Women's Communications Workshop at the Leadership Institute in 2014. Ashley says that participating in these trainings helped her to find a network of conservative women who have continued to support her endeavor to be elected to the Board of Education in Washington, D.C. When asked what advice she would give to young people in the conservative movement, Ashley responded, "I believe all young conservatives should keep their minds open when facing new experiences. . . as a young conservative, you are an ambassador to the movement... Be proud to be a conservative!" Jami Averwater is a summer intern in the External Affairs Department for the Leadership Institute. Follow her on Twitter (@Jamikristin). The Leadership Institute offers over 47 types of training programs, working with more than 1,619 conservative student groups, and helping employers connect with conservative job seekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 175,000 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders. For more information, please visit www.LeadershipInstitute.org.
Technology team works daily to keep programs running
Parker Johnson
August 18, 2016
Technology team works daily to keep programs running
In the digital age, information and mission-critical communications move fast. In the non-profit world, organizations like the Leadership Institute have gone almost entirely digital in our pivot to the information age and in doing so have greatly increased our ability to communicate with students, graduates, and donors across the nation. However, all of this decreased overhead and quick communication says little about the most integral part of a digital organization's vital asset: effective internal technical support. This past summer, I had the opportunity to intern with the Leadership Institute in the technology department. My biggest objective when coming to the Leadership Institute was to learn if my schooling thus far had prepared me professionally to work in a full-time position. Thanks to the incredibly welcoming and fun work environment, I now know for certain that I am ready to step into the career world when I graduate in May of 2017. During my internship, I was able to work on a variety of projects and touched on almost every facet our tech support team's responsibilities. The solid base education that I've garnered here has prepared me to step into a development role in the technology department at the Leadership Institute. As a member of the tech support team, I was also responsible for troubleshooting problems around the office. This allowed me to get out of the tech suite and introduce myself to the many talented and enthusiastic people working at the Leadership Institute. By helping with varied technological problems, I felt like a valued and useful member of the team. I am very grateful for the opportunity to work with the Leadership Institute this past summer. Not only has it further convinced me that the conservative movement is alive and well, but it has shown me that there are many opportunities to advance professionally with like-minded people. As a team, the technology and other departments can continue to work together for the advancement of our mission. Parker Johnson is a summer intern in the Techonology Department at the Leadership Institute. The Leadership Institute offers over 47 types of training programs, working with more than 1,619 conservative student groups, and helping employers connect with conservative job seekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 175,000 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders. For more information, please visit www.LeadershipInstitute.org.
Conservatives Learn Data Skills for Campaigns
R. McKinley
August 11, 2016
Conservatives Learn Data Skills for Campaigns
Early this summer, I was among 40 students who attended the Leadership Institute's first-ever Campaign Data Workshop. Since liberals began using data driven technology in 2004, conservatives have put themselves at a disadvantage by stubbornly sticking with inefficient paper walk books. Their campaigns have suffered the consequences. During the evening workshop, attendees heard topics ranging from general campaign advice to specific data applications in case studies. “Data driven technology acts as a force multiplier and data can help campaign managers make key decisions," said Joshua Fimbres, a Business Intelligence Analyst at Freedom Partners. Joshua specifically spoke on data and why it is important for campaigns. He showed various companies who provide data services to campaigns, and strategies to use voter data within the different phases of a campaign. “In fact,” Joshua went on to say, “I would even go as far as to say that all campaign structure exists to implement these data driven decisions." He also covered examples of strategies he implemented in California and Maryland where voter data was used to effectively map out campaigns. Chris Stolte, Director of Campaign Accounts from i360, followed with a practical exercise on how to use their i360 app. Students downloaded the company's app during the lecture and practiced its use by generating a mock call list and walk book. One student in the workshop raised his hand to vouch for the application. As an employee at uCampaign, the student had previous experience with the program while placed on the Ted Cruz campaign. He also added valuable insight on how their application helped the Ted Cruz campaign effectively reach and mobilize voters using the freshly updated data provided by the other users. Many of the students' own campaign experiences shone through during a group exercise which provided an opportunity to create questions to identify potential voters. Laughter, discussion, and flying pens brought a sense of camaraderie as attendees shared different voter ID questions with the class. Thomas Bingham, Political Training Coordinator at the Leadership Institute, closed out the evening training workshop by emphasizing the winning difference on close campaigns. "Comparing a campaign with no technology at all going full throttle, to one with a smaller staff using technology and data to make decisions on their campaign, it can make a difference in performance of anywhere from 5% to 8%," he said. As a former campaign volunteer myself, I can tell you there is a night and day difference between the paper walk book system and the modernized system. The paper system often leaves you with frustrated volunteers, missing data, and wastes time, while data technology provides up-to-the-minute updates to headquarters, making it easy for volunteers to see their own progress and succeed. Learning how to effectively collect and use voter data is essential for anyone who is serious about winning a modern election; attending the Campaign Data Workshop gave many campaigns a head start. The next Campaign Data workshop is to take place on August 17 in Arlington, Virginia. R. McKinley is an intern in the Political Training department at the Leadership Institute. Click here for more information on upcoming trainings. The Leadership Institute offers more than 47 types of training programs, works with more than 1,643 conservative student groups, and helps employers connect with conservative job seekers. Since the Institute's 1979 founding, LI has trained more than 175,000 conservative activists, students, and leaders. Graduates include members of Congress, state legislators, local officials, media personalities, and conservative organization leaders. For more information, please visit www.LeadershipInstitute.org.
Former intern promotes conservative values in his home country of Denmark
Mari Vogel
August 5, 2016
Former intern promotes conservative values in his home country of Denmark
Former Leadership Institute intern Ulrik Boesen is working to promote conservative values in his home country of Denmark. Ulrik, 26, has been involved in politics for more than ten years. As a teenager in Denmark, he got involved with the Danish Liberal Youth, doing grassroots campaigning and educating other party members on conservative philosophy. In 2012, he took an interest in the United States presidential election and worked with the Danish Liberal Youth (DLY) to volunteer for Mitt Romney's 2012 presidential campaign. “The passion and values of the people I met back then made me believe in the movement," he said. In the spring of 2013, Ulrik interned at the Leadership Institute, an opportunity which he credits with teaching him the dedication, execution, and public relations skills which he uses in the workplace today. “I must say that my time at LI was one of the best of my life, and not only because I met the love of my life." (Boesen met his long-term girlfriend during his time in the Washington, D.C. area.) Since returning to Denmark, Ulrik has worked at Japan Tobacco International, one of the world's largest tobacco companies, as the Corporate Affairs and Communications Manager. He enjoys the challenge of working in public relations and government with a product that is highly regulated. Ulrik hopes to continue supporting the international movement for personal freedoms and property rights, particularly in Denmark. He has been a member of the Danish political party, Venstre, for the last decade and has supported candidates in policy, development, and communications. As for advice he would give to other conservatives, he says, “I believe in the conservative values and the security you get from living by them." He also recommends getting involved in youth politics and campaigns at the earliest opportunity. “You must be willing to put yourself on the line. If you are willing to put your time and passion towards something, you will see great results." Learn more about LI's International Training. Learn more about the Institute's internship program and apply here. Mari Vogel is a summer intern in the Grassroots Department for the Leadership Institute. For more information, please visit www.LeadershipInstitute.org.
Leading Without Authority
Patricia Simpson
July 26, 2016
Leading Without Authority
Most of us don't run an organization or company, we aren't calling the shots, and we certainly aren't signing the checks. But that doesn't mean we can't be leaders in our current positions. Here are some helpful tips to put you in a position to influence your peers, and even your supervisors. 1. See yourself as a leader. If you don't have confidence in yourself or your abilities, you can't assume anyone else will. Whatever task you are assigned, become an expert in it. Confidence often comes when you feel knowledgeable, and when you're confident you command respect. 2. Having a network means you're connected. A good manager appreciates when their subordinates have contacts that can help a project be successful. If you know someone at another organization or company who would provide a positive impact on the project you're working on, speak up and let your supervisor know. There's a good chance they'll listen. 3. Don't present problems. Present solutions. If you find yourself hitting roadblocks when working on a project, figure out the best way to work around it. When you let your supervisor know about the problem, you should already have a solution. It shows responsibility, creativity, and innovation – and puts your ideas and actions in the driver's seat. 4. Act like you've been there before. There is always going to be a scenario in which you've never found yourself before. If you take charge and tackle the problem head on without hesitation, individuals are much more likely to listen to you because you are the automatic “expert.” 5. It's a game of pushing and pulling. Figure out how other people communicate. Some are influenced by being pulled into a situation through leading and involving while others are pushed through inquiring and proposing. Once you identify how an individual is influenced, you can adapt your approach to any individual to make them more likely to listen and follow you. Use these five tips to drive results wherever it is you're currently working. Peers will follow your lead and supervisors will notice the example you're setting for others. If you're driven and learn to read others, you don't need a title to be a true leader. Patricia Simpson is the Director of Career Programs at the Leadership Institute. In addition to overseeing the Division's trainings, like the Conservative Career Workshop, she manages all aspects of ConservativeJobs.com -- the Institute's free job placement service.
Leadership Institute graduate uses training to play active role in the Republican National Convention
Jami Averwater
July 19, 2016
Leadership Institute graduate uses training to play active role in the Republican National Convention
Joy Lee is a graduate of the Leadership Institute. She served as an attorney at the Committee on Arrangements for the 2016 Republican National Convention. Joy was born in Seoul, South Korea, and raised in Los Angeles, CA and Baltimore County, MD. Joy is a proud graduate of University of Maryland and Washington and Lee University School of Law. Read her interview about her experiences at the Leadership Institute and the Republican National Convention. 1. How did being a Leadership Institute (LI) graduate prepare you to work for the Legal Division at the Committee on Arrangements for the 2016 Republican National Convention (“COA”)? I attended the Leadership Institute's Women's Leadership Training in March 2014 in Arlington, Virginia with dozens of other women from around the country. Though this training did not prepare me for the legal and substantive parts of my role today, it provided me with a general framework as I started my career. Politics and the field of law are often considered to be male-dominated fields, so it's especially important for young women to learn how to present themselves as leaders wherever their careers take them. I was fortunate to be surrounded by and learn from some of the best legal, political, and logistics operatives in our party—many of whom are women. 2. How many months in advance does the COA begin to plan the Convention? I moved to Cleveland from Washington, DC for this position in late February/early March 2016, just under five months before the start of the Convention. At that point, the COA was already staffed to approximately fifty people, most of whom moved to Cleveland from various parts of the country. The first staff member of the COA was hired more than a year in advance of the Convention. At its peak, the COA had approximately 120 staffers, dozens of independent contractors and interns, and hundreds of volunteers. 3. Why was Cleveland chosen as the location for the 2016 Republican National Convention for the third time in history? The last time the Republican National Convention came to Cleveland was June 1936. Since then, the city of Cleveland has had its share of losses—economical and sports-related—but in recent years, Cleveland has experienced a resurgence. To showcase that on a national and even international level, the city of Cleveland submitted a bid to host not only the Republican National Convention but also the Democratic National Convention for three cycles in a row. When I asked a member of the Site Selection Committee why they chose Cleveland, he answered, “We felt special there.” Now that I've been in Cleveland for a few months, I can relate to that sentiment. The city of Cleveland has welcomed us with open arms, and it's evident how much this Convention means to the people of Cleveland. Especially in light of its recent NBA Championship—its first sports championship since 1964 and effectively earning its reputation as being a cursed sports city until now—there is a distinct buzz around town. It's exciting to be a part of history, not just for the party, but also for the city of Cleveland.
Happy Independence Day
Mitch Nozka
July 4, 2016
Happy Independence Day
They called him “Silent Cal.” Calvin Coolidge, America's 30th president, was known as a man of few words in his private life. But on the presidential stage, when he had to lead our country, Coolidge spoke with conviction to the American people. “Collecting more taxes than is absolutely necessary is legalized robbery,” Coolidge said. Appropriately for a man of principle, Coolidge was born on the 4th of July. As you and I enter into this Independence Day weekend, please enjoy this wisdom spoken by Coolidge on the 150th anniversary of our nation: “We are obliged to conclude that the Declaration of Independence represented the movement of a people. It was not, of course, a movement from the top. Revolutions do not come from that direction. It was not because it was proposed to establish a new nation, but because it was proposed to establish a nation on new principles, that July 4, 1776, has come to be regarded as one of the greatest days in history. The American Revolution represented the informed and mature convictions of a great mass of independent, liberty-loving, God-fearing people who knew their rights, and possessed the courage to dare to maintain them.” In a day where the left spits upon our patriotism, as long as I have breath, I will dare to maintain constitutional, liberty-loving, God-fearing convictions. And you are patriotic and courageous. Thank you for standing with the Leadership Institute to train grassroots conservatives to restore and protect America's founding principles against those who work to destroy them.
Leadership Institute welcomes summer 2016 intern class
Jami Averwater
June 16, 2016
Leadership Institute welcomes summer 2016 intern class
The Leadership Institute recently welcomed the 98th intern class to Arlington, Virginia and I am personally very excited to be one of them. My intern class exhibits diversity in age, level of education, college major, and career aspirations, but we all share one important goal in common: we want to strengthen the conservative movement. Since our arrival, we have had the opportunity to get acclimated to the office and to the area by attending the annual staff retreat and participating in a competitive scavenger hunt through the city. During our time here at Leadership Institute, we will host conservative leaders for weekly private dinners, visit Members of Congress on Capitol Hill, and complete projects of high responsibility for our respective departments. There are thirteen of us interns for the summer semester, many of whom are residing in the Sacher House. The opportunity to reside in the house allows a convenient, safe place for us to stay during our time with the Leadership Institute and has proven to never allow for a dull moment. Kelsey Mix (Fairfax, Virginia) is an intern in the Career Services department and spent her first few weeks planning and promoting an upcoming workshop titled "Conservative Intern Workshop". A recent graduate from William & Mary, she hopes to use what she learns during the internship to land a job on the Hill. Kelsey says she enjoys living in the Sacher House and bonding with the other interns because they “are all passionate and involved in their communities and in the movement”. Elijah Montes, a sophomore in his home state of Louisiana, is interning for LI Studios. His most critical duties are to maintain, manage, and operate the equipment used to film the LI Webinars, maintain the headshots for the staff and interns, and assist in the daily operations of the studio crew. Ben Becker (Osseo, Wisconsin) recently completed his freshman year at Bob Jones University as a Business Administration major. Ben is excited to be working with David Blair in the Youth Leadership School program. His duties entail recruiting for the schools and ensuring that the days leading up to it go smoothly as possible. Ben says he enjoys living in the Sacher House with the other interns because he is expanding his network and learning more about the conservative movement from his new housemates. He is also excited to enjoy the benefits of convenient Leadership Institute trainings, such as the Intro to Campaign Data workshop. As a group of new friends, we spent Memorial Day weekend visiting Arlington Cemetery and preparing a delicious meal together. We also recently hosted our first speaker for dinner at the Sacher House and met with key leaders on the Hill to spread the word about the resources available at the Leadership Institute. As one of these passionate thirteen interns, I look forward to growing my network with this group.
In Memory of Richard (
Morton C. Blackwell
June 14, 2016
In Memory of Richard ("Rick") E. Hendrix (1957-2016)
With great sadness, I report the passing of a friend, a colleague, a leader in the conservative movement, and a good and humble man. Rick Hendrix passed away yesterday, June 13, at Fairfax INOVA Hospital. He was surrounded by his loving family and friends. Rick worked as a direct mail fundraiser for more than three decades. Most know him as a founding partner of ClearWord Communications Group, a successful and effective high-dollar direct mail agency. For 10 years before that, from 1993 to 2003, Rick ran the direct mail program here at the Leadership Institute. He oversaw a more than tenfold increase in the Institute's donor base. Staff often joked that Rick could write in my voice even better than I could. For the last 23 years, Rick provided the copy for many of the Institute's monthly mailings. His work generated millions of dollars in donations that have made the Institute's many activities possible. Rick volunteered as a lecturer for almost all of the Institute's fundraising schools. Over the years, he taught thousands of conservatives how to build fundraising programs for their organizations. The entire conservative movement and our country benefitted greatly from Rick's generosity in sharing his time and talent. Rick was the director of the Direct Mail Track at Madison Down Under, a fundraising conference sponsored by the Fundraising Institute of Australia, and was a regular speaker at American University's Campaign Management Institute. He was a certified fundraising executive (CFRE) and a member of both the Direct Marketing Fundraisers Association and the Association of Fundraising Professionals. He was active in Republican politics in Virginia and served as a member of the Electoral Board in Prince William County. He was also a member of the Board of Directors of my Conservative Leadership PAC. Rick is survived by his wife Taania and their three daughters, Emily, Laura, and Megan. Morton C. Blackwell President Leadership Institute
Potential for Excellence
Elizabeth McCullough
June 13, 2016
Potential for Excellence
I recently stepped away from my desk and slipped downstairs into the LI Conservative Intern Workshop. Because who can resist the lure of free Chick-fil-a? Not I. Neither could 42 interns from various conservative organizations. Sessions started promptly, beginning with Patricia Simpson, LI Director of Career Services. "Every single one of you have the potential for excellence." She paused. “You must think of yourself as a leader.” I haven't been an intern for 10 years, but I felt myself challenged to re-evaluate myself and my goals. “I wake up every morning and say to myself, ‘Let's be awesome today.” Meanwhile, out in the hall, Aynsley Harrison, Career Programs Manager, bled red ink over intern resumes. When she taught the incredibly practical Resume Workshop, I mentally tore up my previously loved resume. Later, a cheerfully honest session on ‘Personal Branding' brought to light the importance of intentional communication, “Make sure people remember you for the right reasons.” All LI trainings are free to every intern. Even if you're not an intern, discounts are often available. Do you strive for excellence? Are you prepared for leadership? Join us at one of the LI upcoming trainings for more ways to ‘be awesome' today. The next Conservative Intern Workshop is coming up next week. Chick-fil-a might even be on the menu.
Making Part Time Jobs Work for You
Patricia Simpson
June 1, 2016
Making Part Time Jobs Work for You
If you're like me, you have what my father jokingly refers to as, “champagne taste on a beer budget.” When I got to DC, my paltry entry-level staffer salary was not enough to sustain my lifestyle (which included “glamorous” things like paying rent and eating Lean Cuisines), so I did what any self-respecting 20-something had to do in that situation - I asked my parents for money! When they said no I did the next best thing – I got myself a part time job. Part time jobs in DC usually fit into one of three main categories – they pay well, they help your career along, or they're something that keeps you sane. Here are some tips on places to look for those jobs and the advantages of each one. They pay well – If you want a part time job that pays well, you're likely going to have to possess a highly technical skill or be willing to do some heavy lifting. There are plenty of folks who know how to do something, and most-likely do it well, but don't want to do it as a career. The benefit here is you can spend less time supplementing your income. Graphic Design HTML coding Moving Companies They help your career – Are you biding time at a non-profit and trying to figure out how to break into a Hill job? Go get a job as a bartender or wait staff at Cap Lounge or Bullfeathers. Do you want to get a job in the conservative or liberty movement? Go snag a job at O'Sullivans in Clarendon and request to work Tuesday nights. It is 100% possible to expand your network while getting paid and I highly recommend doing it. I know several people who got hired to a new position simply because they made a smart connection while working at a bar or being paid $20 to pass out stuffed mushrooms at a private fundraiser. Bars/restaurants frequented by industry employees Organizations and businesses needing extra help after hours Event staff for fundraisers Political call centers They keep you sane – Sometimes making extra money should just be fun. I've worked at a store just to get an employee discount on merchandise and I've worked at a frozen custard shop because I wanted to meet nice people in a cool neighborhood. I have a friend who umpires Little League games. Stress-relieving jobs are like therapy sessions that pay you at the end. Your favorite retail store (DISCOUNTS!) Babysitting or dog-sitting Umpire/referee As fiscal conservatives we need to make sure we're practicing what we preach. The bottom line is if you need the extra cash, you can find a part time job that will benefit you. And if you don't need the money, sometimes a part time job can be a way to blow off steam, a way to meet new people, or your first step toward a new career.
A Letter from Morton this Memorial Day
Morton C Blackwell
May 30, 2016
A Letter from Morton this Memorial Day
Please let me take a moment with you to remember our fallen soldiers and what their sacrifice means on this Memorial Day. Thanks to our armed forces, you and I possess many precious freedoms in America. I've been to dozens of countries around the world. Yes, some of those countries are fairly safe and have modern amenities. But many others are not. Some are crime-ridden or war-torn. And some have a citizenry who have over the years fallen asleep and given away their freedoms to socialist overlords. America has our share of problems. But I've always been grateful to return to a country that beats all the alternatives. The work of the Leadership Institute cannot match the sacrifice of those who fought and died to protect the United States of America and all of us in it. But, by the blessing of God, and with your help, the Leadership Institute will train patriotic conservatives to preserve and advance our nation's founding principles – and make sure those who sacrificed themselves to protect those principles are honored and did not die in vain. Thank you for taking a moment to remember with me. Cordially, Morton C. Blackwell President Leadership Institute
Never Too Young – Teen Eagles Soak Up Activist Training
Elizabeth McCullough
May 6, 2016
Never Too Young – Teen Eagles Soak Up Activist Training
'You do not have to wait until you are 18 to make a difference -- you can start today.' This Spring, fifteen Tennessee Teen Eagles students, and parents landed in Washington, DC for a long-awaited trip-of-a-lifetime. Teen Eagles is affiliated with Eagle Forum, founded by conservative pioneer, Phyllis Schafly. After a year of studying history and politics, these bright students arrived to see history for themselves. First stop -- the Leadership Institute. While touring the U.S. Capitol at night, catching a free opera concert at the Kennedy Center, and visiting the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, the Teen Eagles soaked up customized training taught by expert faculty and stayed in the LI dorms. Steven Sutton, Leadership Institute's Vice President of Development, spoke on the Real Nature of Politics. “Never attack the opponent; rather, define the opponent. Work in your community - do things that make a positive difference.” Guest lecturer and former LI Regional Field Coordinator, Matthew Hurtt, taught effective grassroots activism techniques and messaging. “Build coalitions among various conservative groups - remember, it's better to add and multiply than to subtract and divide.” Jeremiah Lorrig, of Generation Joshua https://www.generationjoshua.org/GenJ/, took the students on a journey through historical political ads, including a Reagan ad https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EU-IBF8nwSY, discussing media messaging and bias. Of course, if you have something to say, you ought to say it well. Dr. John Shosky brought his talents in public speaking, challenging students to step out of their comfort zone and bravely face the mic. Through every session, the theme remained the same: "We are a government 'By the people, For the people.' But that only works if the people are engaged and involved. And you're never too young to make a difference." -- Jeremiah Lorrig Engaging and practical, the Teen Eagles left D.C., a bit sunburned but excited to get involved when they returned to Tennessee. “The training I received at the Leadership Institute was an eye opening experience to how politics really work. It was extremely informative and very well prepared. It also made me want to come back soon for more training,” said Janey age 18. “Leadership Insitute Training helped me realize that I could be an influential role in America's present and future. Each speaker was very passionate about what they were teaching and I obtained so much knowledge from them. I left each class feeling inspired and longing to learn more,” said Rachel, age 17. Interested in making a difference for the conservative cause? Check out the complete list Leadership Training here.
The Leadership Institute is Hiring
Morton Blackwell
May 2, 2016
The Leadership Institute is Hiring
Just when you think it couldn't get worse, liberal college professors and administrators find new levels of shamelessness and fury. Their commitment would be impressive -- if it were not so dangerous. That is why the Leadership Institute is hiring field reps to level the playing field on college campuses. Here is just one example of how hostile colleges have become for conservatives. Former University of Missouri communications professor Melissa Click was caught on camera yelling profanity at police officers and blocking a student reporter (the irony!) during on-campus protests. She yelled for “muscle” to physically push the student out of the way. Last month, she was fired by the university's Board of Curators in a 4-2 vote. The professor blames the Board for bowing to “conservative voices.” The American Association of University Professors will vote in June to decide whether to censure the university for its decision. And, as you can see from the vote, two University of Missouri Board members took her side. What a time to be a conservative on college campus. That's why the Leadership Institute is doubling down on our National Field Program this fall. Since 1997, LI's National Field Program has sent out teams of motivated, highly trained conservative activists. LI field reps help students promote and defend their conservative principles on campus. Their work has resulted in a nationwide network now of 1,755 independent conservative campus groups. You -- or someone you know -- can become one of the nation's best-trained, most effective, conservative leaders through the Leadership Institute's 2016 Fall Field Representative Program. Opportunities for full-time paid jobs to fight for your values do not come along very often. Field reps receive up to $17,000 for 12 weeks of work, plus nine days of intensive training. This exclusive training teaches you the tools and techniques necessary for success in the field. Top performers will also be invited to extend their contracts for additional semesters. The experience and connections gained from this position have helped former field reps launch careers in: Grassroots activism Political campaigns Public policy Congressional offices Conservative non-profit organizations Don't wait -- take advantage of this unique opportunity today. Apply online at www.ConservativeJobs.com/FieldRep. These positions fill up fast, so time is of the essence.
What I learned at the TV Workshop
Elizabeth McCullough
April 25, 2016
What I learned at the TV Workshop
I confess that I wasn't too sure what I was getting myself into when I found myself in the front row of the Leadership Institute's monthly On-Camera TV training. All I knew was that if I'd known I would be on camera, I would have worn more makeup. Trying not to panic over my impending doom, I learned more about a few of my fellow students. As a busy mom, Christine Olson didn't have time to spend a day in the Studio. But then again, with an important TV interview looming, she knew couldn't afford not come. Despite having no hesitation speaking to large groups, her brain always froze in front of a camera. Even though it was Spring Break, Tristan Justice stayed in town for one of the limited seats in the highly sought after on-camera TV Training. As a college freshman, Tristan dedicates his time to conservatism activism and wants to be prepared as possible. That morning, at 8:50 am, conservative lawyer Aaron checked his email and saw there was an opening in the previously full TV training. “I had 20 minutes to rent a car.” He immediately drove 4 hours from New York City to the Sacher Multimedia Center in Arlington, VA and walked in right on time. You could feel the nervous energy in the air as guest faculty Beverly Hallberg smiled cheerfully behind the desk, almost as if the dreaded camera and microphone were her friends. Beverly has been on all sides of the camera. Producer, director, and host are just a few of the shoes she's filled. Before starting her own business, Beverly was also the Director of the Sacher Multimedia Center. Now she returns to teach uneasy yet eager students how to distil their message for TV. Under Beverly's encouraging instruction and honest feedback, I found myself thawing and even excited about my next turn in front of the camera. Everything she said mattered -- no filler information. Together we learned to ‘block' and ‘bridge' our message. As we fought through our camera fears, comradery and friendship replaced the jitters. The whole class cheered the next one to go ‘live.' By the end of the day, Christine was not only smiling at the camera but also at the top of the class. Aaron didn't dread the drive back to New York, “I knew it would be worth it -- and I wasn't disappointed.” My only regret was that it was over. And that I hadn't worn more makeup. Good thing the Leadership Institute hosts On-Camera TV Training every month -- I'll be in the front row again soon.
Online Advocacy and Activism as a Tool for Action
Paul Van Remortel
April 19, 2016
Online Advocacy and Activism as a Tool for Action
In the digital era, videos that are really popular "go viral." This is true of online petitions as well - they spread quickly across social networks and a viral petition takes on a life of its own. For activists, this is a Godsend. Petitions have historically relied on word of mouth and community bonds to gain traction (and signatures). Today, it's easier than ever to rally thousands of individuals who share a given point of view and will show their support through signatures and sharing alike, substantially multiplying the impact. Unfortunately, the Left has dominated the medium through sites like Change.org, which has gathered more than 100 million users in support of primarily liberal causes. That success has fueled a myth that the tactic of online petitioning is one that only “progressives” can or want to use. But conservatives are increasingly realizing the benefits — and necessity — of incorporating online tools into modern activism efforts. Fortunately, anyone can become an effective advocate for any of the issues they care about with just a few simple steps. First, identify a cause you are passionate about — it doesn't have to be a national issue like Common Core or the Second Amendment. Sometimes the most powerful, effective petitions address local issues that others in your community care about as well. At StandUnited, an online platform we created to level the playing field for supporters of individual liberty, free enterprise, and limited government, individuals have created petitions that have had diverse impacts, from successfully requesting that Congress repeal the Medical Device Tax, to saving a historic Confederate War memorial in Portsmouth, Va. The next step is to identify the decision makers that will be able to effectively address the issue at hand. This could mean your local city council or the president of the United States ­— the beauty of digital activism is that anyone is easily accessible with your message. After identifying the decision makers for your issue, create and share a thoughtful, articulate petition with friends, family, neighbors and like-minded individuals. Nothing has made activism easier and more effective than social media, which is why it's so crucial that you share your petition on your social media profile to make sure as many people as possible see it. You might even be surprised by who agrees with you. Make sure that your local media is aware of your petition, and update them on the progress of the petition and the importance of your cause. This can be the most daunting part of the process, especially if you are not familiar with media outreach. Fortunately, most local media are interested in the issues that impact their city or state, and media coverage of your petition is one of the most effective ways to get the attention of decision makers. A great opportunity to get media coverage is to deliver your petition in person to the decision maker. If there is a deadline such as a vote, a hearing, or an election, use this opportunity to press the decision maker on your issue and get publicity. Finally, don't give up on your issue. Activism isn't a process that works immediately — sometimes it takes weeks or months for a petition to gain steam. Keep working to spread awareness of your petition and the issues at hand, and you're likely to see your hard work pay off. Thanks to the rise of digital activism, that sentiment is truer than it's ever been. Never have individual voices had a louder megaphone, higher platform or more direct access to decision makers, and as a result the power of the petition is greater than it's ever been. You have the power to make your voice heard. This piece was adapted from a recent Column on Townhall.com. Paul Van Remortel is the senior product manager at Intermarkets, Inc., a privately held digital media firm founded in 1997. Paul will be leading the “Online Advocacy and Activism as a Tool for Action” webinar hosted by the Leadership Institute on April 27. For a free registration visit https://www.leadershipinstitute.org/live/?ID=31958
Win America Back – through campaign powerhouses
Morton Blackwell
April 8, 2016
Win America Back – through campaign powerhouses
“I got involved in politics because of Barack Obama's election,” said Matt Krause. “I have four kids. I didn't want to be the generation that didn't leave a better country to my children and grandchildren than those who came before me.” I can't tell you how many times I've heard conservatives tell me a story similar to Matt's. But I'm encouraged more Americans every day wake up to the danger our country faces and take action. Matt Krause took the Leadership Institute's Future Candidate School and won election to the Texas House of Representatives. As a donor, you empower my staff and me to train thousands of conservative candidates and activists like Matt and turn them into campaign powerhouses. Together, you and I – and the conservatives we train – advance our shared conservative principles to win America back. The training for conservatives – and the success – you make possible To win America back from the left, the Leadership Institute will hold numerous comprehensive training schools this year to equip campaigners and candidates for action. For campaigners, the Leadership Institute's Campaign Management School teaches them how to: Create a strategic campaign plan Build a grassroots organization of trained volunteers Plan a get-out-the-vote ground operation Mobilize voters to the polls Win the election “The Leadership Institute is a training ground for the conservative movement,” said Senator Ted Cruz. “In fact, one of the ‘secret weapons' in our upset Senate victory in 2012 was top notch volunteers and staff members trained by Morton Blackwell and the Leadership Institute.” LI does not support or oppose candidates, but once trained, Leadership Institute graduates become hot campaign commodities and work for conservative candidates of their choice at all levels of government – on races for city council all the way up to the White House. In LI's Future Candidate School, aspiring candidates learn how to: Assemble a network of loyal volunteers and campaign staff Get on the election ballot Develop a winning campaign message Handle hostile news media Connect with voters on a personal level Today, 32 Leadership Institute graduates are U.S. Senators and Representatives, 18 hold statewide offices, and 422 serve as state representatives. Leadership Institute graduates hold elective office in all 50 states – thanks to the training you provided them with your support. The Leadership Institute's new Campaign Academy builds on the trainings proved to create winning candidates. LI's Campaign Academy trains everyday Americans from Main Street America – business owners, teachers, doctors, pastors, and hard-working professionals. This new crop of principled conservative candidates, betrayed by establishment leaders, has stepped forward to fight the liberals themselves. Candidates in LI's Campaign Academy learn how to run for elective office and focus on how to build neighborhood teams of volunteers, connect with voters door-to-door and over the phone, research the electorate and opposition candidates, and prepare for media interviews. Everything is on the line in 2016 In the 2016 elections, the stakes are high. America will either continue down the road to socialism – on which there's a point of no return – or, conservatives will steer America back toward freedom and prosperity. With your help, I'm doing everything in my power to build campaign powerhouses to win America back. Since the 2014 elections, my staff has trained 554 conservatives in LI's Future Candidate and Campaign Management Schools, and another 8,201 trained in 256 political training schools. I have four Campaign Academies scheduled in battleground areas this year, with more to come. Let me end with an encouraging word from someone you trained – the second-youngest legislator in America. “The Leadership Institute gave me the tools I needed to beat an experienced liberal Democrat,” said 19-year-old New Hampshire state representative Yvonne Dean-Bailey. “Their training makes young leaders successful in organizing campaigns. I'm so thankful for the donors who helped LI train me to win.”
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